Wives out e-spy their husbands in tech snooping

Dirty text messages and risqué emails are responsible for breaking up many a celebrity marriage and us regular folk seem to following suit, forgoing the days of checking jacket pockets and sniffing the shirt collar for the scent of another lover, instead turning to technology for a spot of electronic-spying.

 

According to a recent study by the London School of Economics and Nottingham Trent University, it is women, not men who are the most likely to prowl through their spouse’s tech-based communications in their alter ego of the stealthy e-spy.

 

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With Microsoft’s latest TV adverts promoting Windows 7’s ‘InPrivate Browsing’ for  those purely innocent, undoubtedly romantic and in no way raunchy moments online that you just don’t want your other half to know about, the tech industry is seemingly trying to increase our privacy, and prevent it being violated by our nearest and dearest.

 

Having quizzed around a thousand middle-aged couples in their recent study, however, the London School of Economics found that 14 percent of wives secretly went through their hubby’s emails, 13 percent took a sly peak at their texts and 10 percent checked up on what sort of websites they had been spending a little too much time on.

 

In contrast, only eight percent of husbands checked up on their wives email habits without their knowing and just seven percent snooped through texts and browser history.

 

Perhaps men are more trusting than women or simply have too much to hide to be checking up on their partners. Either way, we are going to go home, empty our inboxes and turn on private browsing, just to ensure that there is no misunderstanding of what is of course completely innocent time online.

 

 

 

 
 


Dirty text messages and risqué emails are responsible for breaking up many a celebrity marriage and us regular folk seem to following suit, forgoing the days of checking jacket pockets and sniffing the shirt collar for the scent of another lover, instead turning to technology for a spot of electronic-spying.

 

According to a recent study by the London School of Economics and Nottingham Trent University, it is women, not men who are the most likely to prowl through their spouse’s tech-based communications in their alter ego of the stealthy e-spy.

 

——————————————————————–
Related Links:
20 Games to ruin your relationship
Mobile seculrity – keep your phone safe
Best mobile broadband dongles to surf the web
——————————————————————–

 

With Microsoft’s latest TV adverts promoting Windows 7’s ‘InPrivate Browsing’ for  those purely innocent, undoubtedly romantic and in no way raunchy moments online that you just don’t want your other half to know about, the tech industry is seemingly trying to increase our privacy, and prevent it being violated by our nearest and dearest.

 

Having quizzed around a thousand middle-aged couples in their recent study, however, the London School of Economics found that 14 percent of wives secretly went through their hubby’s emails, 13 percent took a sly peak at their texts and 10 percent checked up on what sort of websites they had been spending a little too much time on.

 

In contrast, only eight percent of husbands checked up on their wives email habits without their knowing and just seven percent snooped through texts and browser history.

 

Perhaps men are more trusting than women or simply have too much to hide to be checking up on their partners. Either way, we are going to go home, empty our inboxes and turn on private browsing, just to ensure that there is no misunderstanding of what is of course completely innocent time online.

 

 

 

 
 


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