Pirates face ‘suspension’ not disconnection

 

Under plans revealed last August,  the upcoming Digital Britain bill would have given ISPs’ powers to terminate the accounts of persistent copyright infringers.

 

The proposals ignited a backlash from open access and human rights activists as well as ISPs (who would be expected to foot half the bill of the enforcement) who argued the measures were wildly disproportionate and at odds with free speech rights.

 

Now, in response to an e-petition, the government says it will use “technical measures” to enforce the new rules instead of terminating accounts.

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More on the Digital Britain bill:

Everything you need to know about Digital Britain

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These measures might be bandwith restriction, daily download limit, or as a last resort, “temporary account suspension.”

 

But Jim Killock of Open Rights Group believes the government hasn’t really changed it’s mind, simply changed the wording to make the plans more palatable.

 

“When is ‘disconnection’ not disconnection? When it is ‘account suspension’, of course,” he writes in the group’s blog.

 

"Please do not be confused by the government’s semantics. (it) decided in the summer that they would not refer to ‘disconnecting’ users, because that sounds harsh and over the top. ‘Temporary account suspension’ sounds much more reasonable,” he added.

 

There’s still no word in the bill on how long a “temporary suspension” might last.


 

Under plans revealed last August,  the upcoming Digital Britain bill would have given ISPs’ powers to terminate the accounts of persistent copyright infringers.

 

The proposals ignited a backlash from open access and human rights activists as well as ISPs (who would be expected to foot half the bill of the enforcement) who argued the measures were wildly disproportionate and at odds with free speech rights.

 

Now, in response to an e-petition, the government says it will use “technical measures” to enforce the new rules instead of terminating accounts.

——————————————————————-

More on the Digital Britain bill:

Everything you need to know about Digital Britain

——————————————————————–

These measures might be bandwith restriction, daily download limit, or as a last resort, “temporary account suspension.”

 

But Jim Killock of Open Rights Group believes the government hasn’t really changed it’s mind, simply changed the wording to make the plans more palatable.

 

“When is ‘disconnection’ not disconnection? When it is ‘account suspension’, of course,” he writes in the group’s blog.

 

"Please do not be confused by the government’s semantics. (it) decided in the summer that they would not refer to ‘disconnecting’ users, because that sounds harsh and over the top. ‘Temporary account suspension’ sounds much more reasonable,” he added.

 

There’s still no word in the bill on how long a “temporary suspension” might last.


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