Music blogs closed by Google back online

Six music blogs shut down by Google’s Blogger for hosting copyright material have now reopened. Pop Tarts, Masala, I Rock Cleveland, To Die By Your Side, It’s a Rap and Living Ears were all closed by Google but have all made alternative arrangements and are in the process of getting back online. One music blog, To Die By Your Side is still offline.

 

Contrary to the transparent, hippie love-in attitude Google has been feeding us of late the search engine giant was unscrupulous at closing the blogs down without warning  yesterday.  Following notices under America’s Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) Google was forced to remove the blogs from Blogger and Blogspot which the company owns. All the blogs in question claim to have been given permission to use the disputed tracks by artists themselves or their record labels.

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According to industry insiders the problem doesn’t lie with Google but with the American Record Labels. Over-zealous or bored leagl teams are likely to have filed a speedy claim and the blogs failed to lodge a counter claim in time.

 

Link: Google (via The Telegraph)

 

 

 


Six music blogs shut down by Google’s Blogger for hosting copyright material have now reopened. Pop Tarts, Masala, I Rock Cleveland, To Die By Your Side, It’s a Rap and Living Ears were all closed by Google but have all made alternative arrangements and are in the process of getting back online. One music blog, To Die By Your Side is still offline.

 

Contrary to the transparent, hippie love-in attitude Google has been feeding us of late the search engine giant was unscrupulous at closing the blogs down without warning  yesterday.  Following notices under America’s Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) Google was forced to remove the blogs from Blogger and Blogspot which the company owns. All the blogs in question claim to have been given permission to use the disputed tracks by artists themselves or their record labels.

————————————————————————————

More on Google

10 ways Google is taking over the world
Google Nexus One review
Google Buzz takes on Twitter and Facebook

————————————————————————————

According to industry insiders the problem doesn’t lie with Google but with the American Record Labels. Over-zealous or bored leagl teams are likely to have filed a speedy claim and the blogs failed to lodge a counter claim in time.

 

Link: Google (via The Telegraph)

 

 

 


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