iPhone jailbreaking legal says US government

Jailbreaking your iPhone, or rooting your Android blower, is no longer illegal in the US. Lawmakers across the pond have amended the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to allow punters to open up their phones for installing legal software.

 

Theoretically, punters can now unlock their phones and install apps or games that have not been deemed suitable by the powers that be, in the case of the iPhone. However, Apple has been quick to state that while it is no longer an offence, jailbreaking does still void your warranty.

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Related links:
iPhone 4 jailbreak: Hacker cracks it
iPhone 3GS jailbreak made public
iOS 4 leaked ahead of 21 June launch
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However, those who distribute the means of jailbreaking your iPhone could still be at risk of legal action, meaning you’ll have to do it DIY-style to be on the safe side. Jailbreaking iPhones has become less necessary as more networks come on board and most apps get the nod from Steve Jobs and co.

 

Make no mistake though, this move undermines Apple’s attempts to maintain complete control overs it iPhone ecosystem, allowing users to do as they please with their phones without legal recourse.

 

Is this a good move? Have you jailbroken your iPhone? Let us know what you think on Twitter or Facebook.

Posted by Joe Minihane


Jailbreaking your iPhone, or rooting your Android blower, is no longer illegal in the US. Lawmakers across the pond have amended the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to allow punters to open up their phones for installing legal software.

 

Theoretically, punters can now unlock their phones and install apps or games that have not been deemed suitable by the powers that be, in the case of the iPhone. However, Apple has been quick to state that while it is no longer an offence, jailbreaking does still void your warranty.

———————————
Related links:
iPhone 4 jailbreak: Hacker cracks it
iPhone 3GS jailbreak made public
iOS 4 leaked ahead of 21 June launch
———————————

However, those who distribute the means of jailbreaking your iPhone could still be at risk of legal action, meaning you’ll have to do it DIY-style to be on the safe side. Jailbreaking iPhones has become less necessary as more networks come on board and most apps get the nod from Steve Jobs and co.

 

Make no mistake though, this move undermines Apple’s attempts to maintain complete control overs it iPhone ecosystem, allowing users to do as they please with their phones without legal recourse.

 

Is this a good move? Have you jailbroken your iPhone? Let us know what you think on Twitter or Facebook.

Posted by Joe Minihane


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