Major Hack Breaches – Websites, Companies 2011

In a world that is becoming more focused on the internet, a great website presence, and hard hitting electronics, new websites come online nearly every second of hte day. In proportion to the number of sites which are increasing, the amount of cybercrime is increasing dramatically too… Thousands of people have been the victim of identity theft, email fraud, online scams, and many other types of cybercrime. One of the most common types of crime is the hacking of a website, and the number of websites hacked has risen in the last few years.

In fact, hijacking Adsense and other things has risen so sharply that experts say more than a million websites a month are being hacked in some cases. Not all of these sites are lacking in website security. In fact, some of them are in the business of website security, which makes it that much more unique for us to read about their site being breached.

In the first few months of 2011, already a large number of websites belonging to major companies have been hacked. They were sites that had some of the best security, and the most security hosting. Which just goes to prove that internet visibility isn’t always a good thing and website security has become increasingly more important to every website.

Here is a list of some of the major websites hacked so far in 2011:

* Qriocity and the PlayStation Network

Sony was forced to shut down the Qriocity and PlayStation Network unexpectedly, and days later Sony released a statement saying that an “external intrusion” was the cause of the sudden shut down. On April 26, Sony released an official statement saying that as many as 77 million Sony PlayStation Network and Qriocity users had been accessed by the intruders. These intruders had obtained the phone numbers, email addresses, home addresses, passwords, and real names of these users, though Sony claimed that the credit card details of users had been encrypted and untouched.

* WordPress.com

WordPress is one of the largest online blog and website platforms, and on April 13th an announcement was made that 13 hackers had been able to break into Auttomatic, the servers that host all of the blogs running on the WordPress platform. There was no information released on the exact details of what details the hackers had made off with, but they could have potentially taken the passwords and source code for nearly 25 million blogs and websites hosted by WordPress.

* Epsilon

Epsilon is an email communications company that handles the communications for over 2,500 companies around the world. Epsilon was the victim of a serious data breach in March of this year, and no less than 26 major companies have confirmed that the lists of their customers’ emails had been taken. These companies included TiVo, Capitol One Bank, JP Morgan Chase, Walgreens, Citi, and Best Buy. While passwords and other sensitive data has been confirmed to be intact, these companies warned that the number of phishing and spam emails were going to increase thanks to this data breach.

* RSA

RSA is the company that makes SecurID authentication tokens, and they reported that their networks had been breached and that data had been stolen from them. Rumors have pointed towards Chinese hackers who had been incited by the Chinese government to make the attacks. While the outcome of the breach has been unclear, the insecurity caused for the 40 million users of SecurID and 250 million smartphone owners is certainly a large repercussion.

* Voice of America

Voice of America, the U.S. government’s official news service, was attacked by a pro-Iran group of cybercriminals calling themselves the Iranian Cyber Army. The Voice of America homepage was edited by the ICA in order to denounce the U.S. participation in the revolutions taking place in the Muslim world.

What all of this goes to prove is that there is a great deal more to be concerned about than SEO trends and article marketing when it comes to building your website. From the largest website down to the smallest, website security is an imperative part of the package… realistically though, how do you secure from some of the best hackers in the world?

The Top HACKS of 2011

InMotion Hosting (Over 700,000 Websites Hacked)

InMotion Hosting Server was hacked by a hacker [email protected] who hacked the whole data center of InMotion Hosting, one of the leading Hosting Service Providers. The hacker added Index.php and Index.html Files leading to hack of so many websites. This surely is one of the biggest hacks of 2011. The sites were hacked on 25 September, 2011.

hack Top Hacked Websites of 2011

Microsoft’s Official Youtube Channel Hacked

Microsoft’s Official Youtube Channel was recently hacked two weeks ago. The hacker removed all the videos uploaded by Microsoft and posted 3-4 short videos promoting some website and showing animation. The location in the profile was changed to “Hey” and the channel’s description reads :

I DID NOTHING WRONG I SIMPLY SIGNED INTO MY ACCOUNT THAT I MADE IN 2006 .

hack1 Top Hacked Websites of 2011

CBI Website Homepage Hacked

The Central Bureau of Investigation website was hacked by an organisation called “ Pakistan Cyber Army“.One of the most secure and
high level website of India was hacked by Pakistan Troop. The hacker defaced the homepage of CBI Website and left with a message “P*k*stanZin*ab**d” . It is embarrassing seeing CBI website being hacked.

Pakistan Supreme Court Website

Pakistan’s Supreme Court Website was hacked by a hacker using name Zombie_Ksa, a pakistani hacker. The hacker seemed to have good intentions as wrote on the website :

“So I am here to request you to go out there and help the poor, needy and hungry”

conveying message to Chief Justice Iftikhar Chaudhary to ban pornographic websites in Pakistan.

More than 10,000 Accounts of Facebook Data Leaked

Swastika, a group of hackers leaked 10,000 Facebook Accounts data on text sharing website, Pastebin. The list has now been removed by Pastebin.

UNESCO E-Platform Hacked

The E-Platform hack of UNESCO Website was also one of the biggest hack of 2011. The hackers group, Fatal Error Crew were successful in defacing UNESCO E-Platform and putting up their index.html file.

hack3 Top Hacked Websites of 2011

BSNL India Website Hacked

Leading Telecom Provider of India Bharat Sanchar Nigam Limited aka BSNL’s website was hacked by a Pakistan Hacker “KhantastiC haX0r”. Although he wasn’t able to get any content from the website, he was successful in defacing the website and putting his credits to website.

Many other Top Notch Websites have been victims of Hackers in 2011,so don’t leave any security flaw in your website, secure it first and then work on it. The list of Top Hacks is huge, but yes the above were selected ones.

Meet HTML, The Spec Formerly Known as HTML5

It won’t be an unpronounceable symbol, but HTML5 is getting a Prince-style name change. From here on out HTML5 will simply be HTML — according to the WHATWG anyway.
Just a day after the W3C unveiled its new HTML5 logo, the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group (WHATWG) has announced that it will drop the term […]

It won’t be an unpronounceable symbol, but HTML5 is getting a Prince-style name change. From here on out HTML5 will simply be HTML — according to the WHATWG anyway.

Just a day after the W3C unveiled its new HTML5 logo, the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group (WHATWG) has announced that it will drop the term “HTML5,” stop the versioning of HTML altogether and instead treat the evolving specification as a “living standard.”

While eliminating the version number from HTML has been part of the WHATWG’s plan from the beginning, the timing of the change is clearly related to the W3C’s attempt to embrace the term “HTML5.” The W3C recently showed off a new HTML5 logo, but the accompanying FAQ used the term HTML5 to cover everything from the actual spec to only tangentially related tools like CSS 3, WOFF and SVG. Many developers saw the W3C’s nebulous use of the term HTML5 as a sign that the term had become, like “AJAX,” just another marketing buzzword.

The W3C has since rewritten its FAQ to clarify and more sharply define just what HTML5 is and is not, but before that happened Ian Hickson, the WHATWG’s editor, announced that the WHATWG was renaming its spec to just HTML. Hickson says the WHATWG was “going to change the name last year but ended up deciding to wait a bit since people still used the term ‘HTML5′ a lot.”

Hickson then makes a not-so-subtle jab at the W3C, saying HTML5 “is now basically being used to mean anything Web-standards-related, so it’s time to move on!”

The W3C has long had a tenuous relationship with the WHATWG. Technically the W3C is the standards body charged with publishing the HTML spec. The WHATWG — a consortium of browser makers — grew out of the W3C’s neglect of HTML and its misguided decision to pursue XHTML 2. Now that both groups are working on the same spec, in theory, their goals are the same. In practice, however, the two groups often butt heads. In other words, just because the WHATWG has decided to abandon the term HTML5, don’t expect it to disappear overnight.

The W3C will continue to work toward “snapshots” that reflect stable milestones of the ever-changing WHATWG version of the spec. For now at least, that means the term HTML5 will be alive and well at the W3C, as the group works through its standard practice of issuing working drafts, holding last calls on changes and finally publishing the spec as a “recommendation.”

Since browser makers have long been well ahead of the W3C when it comes to implementing the latest and greatest parts of the HTML5 spec, they will likely focus on the WHATWG’s HTML spec, which will, like Google’s Chrome browser, follow a “rolling release” schedule.

No doubt the media and marketers will continue to use HTML5 as a buzzword that means far more than just the spec, but even that’s not always a bad thing. There’s no doubt that Apple, Google, the New York Times and everyone else who’s used HTML5 as an analog for the New Shiny has helped HTML5 — and all the other tools it’s come to stand for — gain momentum. As web developer Jeff Croft puts it, “sometimes we just need a word to rally behind.”

While not everyone understands the nuances of what’s HTML5, what’s CSS 3 and what’s just JavaScript, that doesn’t change the fact that everyone is excited about building a better web and that is exactly what HTML(5) is designed to do.

See Also:

Celebrate the Holidays With the Advent Calendar for Web Nerds

How do we know it’s holiday season? Sure, it’s getting colder, and possibly even snowing where you live. But the real sign for web nerds is that 24Ways, the annual advent calendar for web geeks, is shining in all its standards-promoting glory.
This year 24Ways is, along with the rest of us, embracing HTML5 and CSS3. […]

How do we know it’s holiday season? Sure, it’s getting colder, and possibly even snowing where you live. But the real sign for web nerds is that 24Ways, the annual advent calendar for web geeks, is shining in all its standards-promoting glory.

This year 24Ways is, along with the rest of us, embracing HTML5 and CSS3. Among the useful hints, tips and tutorials so far this year are Christian Heilmann’s take HTML5’s Local Storage API for offline content and Scott Schiller’s The State of HTML5 audio.

On the CSS side, Inayaili de León has a great CSS wishlist, which includes comments from Tab Atkins, a CSSWG member who addresses many of the possibilities raised in the piece. One particularly noteworthy item in de León’s piece is something we didn’t know existed: the :-moz-any() selector group. Although not yet a formal part of the CSS spec, it looks like the any() selector has a good chance of making it in one day.

The any() selector would be useful for shortening code, for example, because HTML5 encourages multiple h1 tags, which might be at all sorts of depths within the page, you could simple write (to borrow Mozilla’s example):

-moz-any(section, article, aside, nav) h1 {
  font-size: 25px;
}

Again, the any() selector is a just a proposal at this point, but it does work in the latest beta of Firefox if you’d like to test it.

Other good articles so far in this year’s 24ways include a look at design workflows and how you can improve your own, and everyone’s perennial favorite — how to avoid the flash of unstyled content when embedding fonts in your page.

This year’s 24Ways also has a new twist: when the series is finished, there will be a limited edition print annual. You can order a copy today, and all proceeds will go to UNICEF.

Altoids Advent Calendar photo by Kim Taylor/Flickr/CC. For instructions, visit her blog.

See Also: