“Sakshat” Low Cost Tablet Computer for Indian Students, Price Rs. 1100

The tablet computer, known as Sakshat, which translates as “before your eyes”, launched as part of a new Rs. 46 billion “National Mission for Education“. This envisages a network of laptops from which students can access lectures, coursework and specialist help from anywhere in India, triggering a revolution in education. A number of publishers have reportedly agreed to upload portions of their textbooks on to the system.

Its launching for students across the country is hoped to bring real affordable digital empowerment to people who cannot afford computing devices normally. It had started off as a Laptop under Rs. 500, then evolved to Rs. 1500 per device project. After that it became a Rs. 1600 Tablet and was set to ship in January 2011. That date wasn’t able to be kept for various reasons and a lot of skepticism regarding the project was in the air.

Kapil Sibal during the unveiling ceremony has stated that a million devices would be made available to students in 2011. The devices will be manufactured at a cost of 1500 (23 Euro) each, half of which will be paid by the government and half by the institutions that would use it.

Government(of India) announced that 10,000 (Sakshat) tablet will be delivered to IIT-Rajasthan in late June and over the next four months 90,000 more would be made available at a price of Rs 2,200/device.

The price of the tablet is going to be Rs. 2,200/- and will not be available to the general public. It will be given to children in educational institutions. Government will subsidize the cost by 50%, so a student would have to pay only Rs. 1,100 for the device.

Following are the Detailed Specifications:

  • 7.0″ Touchscreensakshath
  • 2 USB ports
  • 32 GB HD
  • 2 GB RAM
  • Wi-Fi
  • Rugged casing with a rubberized feel
  • Fixed Ethernet ability
  • Mini and full USB
  • miniSD card slot
  • Subscriber Identity Module (SIM card) slot
  • Video out
  • Headphone jack
  • 2 Watts of power consumption with solar charging option
  • In-built keyboard
  • Video conferencing facility
  • Multimedia content
  • Linux Operating System (could be Android)
  • Open Office
  • SciLab
  • Option for Solar Charging
  • Internet browsing

Software

  • Android operating system
  • Educational software developed at Indian Institute of Technology
  • Web browsing, video conferencing and word processing software

Samsung Galaxy S II Android Smartphone – Price Rs. 32,830

Samsung Galaxy S II is currently the world’s thinnest Android smartphone featuring a 1.2 GHz dual-core SoC Processor and runs Android version 2.3 (Gingerbread) Operating System.

The Dual Core Application Processor offers unsurpassed functionality like faster browsing, quicker Multi-tasking, smoother UI, snappier streaming, highly efficient gaming and encoding/decoding ability that supports video play and recording.

Masterfully crafted into a slim and light body, the smartphone supports trimmed chassis and feather-light innards. The most striking feature about this handset is its 4.3″ display screen powered by Super AMOLED plus technology to enhance readability.

The smartphone sports a 8.0 MP auto-focus Primary camera and a 2.0 MP front-facing secondary camera with a built-in LED flash that captures crisp and detailed pictures in low light.

Another attractive feature is the Samsung Live Panel that lets you access your contents directly through its new UX, a magazine style layout that selects contents that you use the most, like your Gallery, Music, Video, SNS, E-Mail, Notes and Games. This live content ecosystem can be customized to your taste.

The one function that the users will love is the All Share function that allows to link wirelessly with a TV, laptop or even audio system to play Multimedia Files directly from the phone. It synchronizes the phone with a compatible DLNA based product.

Samsung has updated its TouchWIZ User Interface overlay too on the Galaxy S II and the changes are mostly positive. The default Samsung weather, clock widgets and power widgets are attractive and functional and one can easily customise the Main Menu by creating folders. This phone surely has an upper edge over its contemporaries.

Samsung Galaxy S II is available at Rs. 32,830 in India. This phone is available for Pre-Order at Rs. 1000/-.

Samsung GALAXY S II Official Live Demo

Motherboard Mano-a-Mano: We Review Three LGA1155 Boards!

The brave new world of LGA1155
There’s good news and bad news for Intel lovers. The bad news is for folks who just bought a motherboard using the LGA1156 socket: Yup, it’s obsolete already. The good news: The LGA1155 motherboards using Intel’s pe…

The brave new world of LGA1155

There’s good news and bad news for Intel lovers. The bad news is for folks who just bought a motherboard using the LGA1156 socket: Yup, it’s obsolete already. The good news: The LGA1155 motherboards using Intel’s performance P67 chipset are swimming with improvements such as native SATA 6Gb/s support, front-panel USB 3.0 headers, and UEFI. The biggest change, of course, is support for Intel’s new line of Sandy Bridge CPUs. These second-generation Core ix processors are not only fast, they’re cheap and overclock like hell. To find a suitable home for your new Sandy Bridge chip, we gathered up boards from old foes MSI, Asus and Gigabyte to see whose next-gen motherboard deserves the honor. Our mini roundup not only gives you a glance at what the latest P67 boards give you, but it gives you an idea of what you’re getting for your money. The MSI board here is a surpringly capable sub-$200 board, while the Asus laddles on features for another sixty bucks. Finally, the Gigabyte represents just what you’re going to get when you crack that $300 pricer barrier. What’s right for you? Read on to find out.

416×234 with html5 and api support

 

 

Asus P8P67 Deluxe

We’ll be honest: We’ve had the most hands-on time with Asus’s new P8P67 Deluxe board of any P67-based board this cycle. That’s because Asus sent a functioning board to us far before its competitors (including Intel) did, and as such, we conducted the bulk of our Sandy Bridge chip testing with the P8P67 Deluxe board.

Usually, early boards mean soldered-on wires, unpredictable performance, and hiccups that are often a consequence of very early hardware. None of that was true of the P8P67 Deluxe board. Out of the box, it offered rock-solid stability and its performance was excellent across the board.

Front-panel USB 3.0 is finally a reality with Asus’s P8P67 Deluxe.

POST the P8P67 Deluxe and you’ll notice the first big change: Universal Extensible Firmware Interface, or UEFI. The arrival of UEFI on the PC might feel like that long-awaited unicorn bar mitzvah, but it’s actually been around for some time. Numerous Intel boards have had UEFI but you’d never know it from looking at their BIOS-like interface.

You won’t get that feeling from the P8P67 Deluxe board, and any misgivings you have regarding the change to UEFI will likely vanish when you see the beautiful interface Asus has developed. The configuration screen alone will remind you how ancient that 16-bit BIOS is. Navigating the UEFI isn’t as intuitive if you’re used to moving about a BIOS, but it’s a brave new world we like.

On the hardware front, Asus packs a lot into this $240 motherboard. With Intel finally releasing a spec for a USB 3.0 internal header, Asus takes advantage by including a 3.5-inch drive-bay adapter with two USB 3.0 ports to boot. Why is this needed? Previously, case enclosures that included front USB 3.0 required you to run cables out of the back of the case and plug into the rear USB 3.0 ports. This eats up your USB 3.0 ports and is inelegant, to say the least. The Deluxe board gives you two front USB 3.0 ports, plus the two on the rear.

The USB 3.0 isn’t native to the P67 chipset, but the SATA 6Gb/s is. Sort of. Intel finally adds SATA 6Gb/s but only two of the ports in the P67’s peripheral controller hub have it. Why? To save money. Intel says running more than two ports would add additional pin-outs to the PCH and, well, that costs dinero. The result is a horrific headache of port confusion. On feature-rich boards like the P8P67 Deluxe, this gives you four SATA 3Gb/s ports plus two SATA 6Gb/s off of the Intel PCH. Add another two SATA 6Gb/s from the Marvell 9128 controller and your SATA mode will greatly depend on which port you luck yourself into. You’ll definitely want to run the Intel SATA 6Gb/s over the Marvell because it’s faster, but you have to RTFM first.

Also cool, but a bit tricky, is the inclusion of Asus’s nifty Bluetooth control option for the board, which lets you boot, reset, shut down, and overclock the board remotely from popular smartphones. Asus said it tweaked the Bluetooth stack and app to make it easier to transfer files from your phone, too. While that aspect worked fine with our Android phone, we couldn’t get the remote capability up and running. We’ve tested it successfully on other Asus boards, so we suspect that it’s a side effect of the early application, or us.

In general performance, the Asus board held its own against the MSI, but both boards traded wins and losses. In other words, don’t consider performance a deciding factor. We’d rather that you look at price, layout, and features. In those respects, it’s hard not to recommend the P8P67 Deluxe as a worthy ride for your new Sandy Bridge chip.

 

Asus P8P67 Deluxe

DONALD

UEFI! Native SATA 6Gb/s

GOOFY

Confusing SATA ports; pre-release drivers are a little wonky.

score:9

 

MSI P67A-GD65

We love Sandy Bridge, and we even like some aspects of the P67 chipset. But, we’ll say it again: Intel’s decision to cheap-out on SATA 6Gb/s will create massive port confusion. With the Asus board, we had to RTFM to figure out which port went to which controller and at what speed. The situation is murkier with the P67A-GD65. The board features eight SATA ports and tells you which are SATA 6Gb/s. Unfortunately, it doesn’t tell you which controller they’re running off of.

Windows 7 is so smart, though, that it will boot a board on the Marvell controller without missing a beat. However, if you’re running a SATA 6Gb/s drive, you’ll want to be on the Intel PCH, which is a good clip faster than the Marvell part. Unfortunately, the European manual that came with our early review board didn’t tell us which controller ran which ports. The only way to figure it out was to plug in the drive, boot the board, and see which controller initialized in the BIOS.

MSI’s P67A-GD65 is a screaming deal.

But let’s not get sidetracked. Despite this minor documentation issue (perhaps Europeans can sense what port to use), the P67A-GD65 is a solid board that’s seriously cheaper than the Asus board on the facing page. And despite costing $60 less than the Asus P67 mobo, the P67A-GD65 is almost on par with its competitor. It has a secondary SATA 6Gb/s controller, an NEC USB 3.0 controller with two ports, and an additional two ports on a USB 3.0 dongle. What you don’t get is the built-in Bluetooth features of the Asus board, nor its dual-Gigabit ports or front USB 3.0 bay, either. And while Asus gives you a choice of a Realtek network PHY or an Intel PHY, the P67A-GD65 gives you only the former. MSI does, however, give you access to Creative Lab’s X-Fi algorithms. And in a tip of the hat to super-duper overclockers, the board also features a header to directly measure voltages off the board.

Like the Asus board, we tested whether this board could boot to a 3TB Western Digital drive, and it passed. Both also offered good USB 3.0 speed, ran SLI just fine, and offered comparable SATA 6Gb/s performance.

One feature that’s slightly disappointing is the MSI ClickBIOS. MSI actually planned to release a board with UEFI more than a year ago, but that board never materialized. Still, we thought the early lead MSI had would have resulted in a highly polished UEFI interface. It’s not terrible, but at times, the interface felt, well, like a BIOS, but with mouse navigation.

We tested all of the boards here with some mild overclocking, pushing our 3.4GHz Core i7-2600K to 4.5GHz using the wimpy stock cooler. As expected, both passed just fine. Our only issue with the MSI board came with installing the drivers for the Creative audio. As with the Asus board, we’ll chalk it up to early drivers or installers. For example, some of the drivers came on a USB key from the press office, so they’re clearly not final.

Overall, the P67A-GD65 doesn’t quite have the panache or super-smooth UEFI interface of the Asus, but it’s also cheaper. In this economy, if that makes the difference to you owning a GeForce GTX 580, it’s worth it.

 

MSI P67A-GD65

BUGS

UEFI! Native SATA 6Gb/s; seriously cheap

DAFFY

Really confusing SATA ports; pre-release drivers are slightly wonky.

score:9

 

Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD7

 

If there’s one thing we know about Gigabyte, it’s that the mobo maker loves USB 3.0. We mean, it loves USB 3.0. How much? The company has been pushing USB 3.0 as its number one feature for a while now, and this tact has apparently worked. The company claims that it’s the No. 1 USB 3.0 motherboard company, whatever that means.

The GA-P67A-UD7 is the pinnacle of USB 3.0 boards to make it in to our hands. Most USB 3.0 boards sport two ports, which is the maximum a single NEC USB host controller will support. Newer boards add another two more ports with a second NEC controller.

Gigabyte goes plumb crazy with six USB 3.0 ports in back plus two USB 3.0 headers for a total of ten possible ports. Gigabyte does this by using two VIA USB 3.0 hub controllers. To be fair, Gigabyte isn’t the only company to do this – we saw a pre-production Asus board with the same hub chips too. But this development still safely consolidates Gigabyte’s position as the king of USB 3.0.

Besides a new color scheme, the UD7 features a ton of USB 3.0 ports and an nForce 200 chip

We’re not just being smart asses either. Despite using the same NEC controller, the GA-P67A-UD7 actually pulled in noticeably better (180MB/s vs 156MB/s) USB 3.0 performance than the MSI P67A-GD65 and Asus P8P67 Deluxe boards. IO on the Marvell and Intel 6Gb/s ports was also better.

In other benchmarks, the UD7 ran just about even with the Asus and MSI. As we’ve said before, the competition usually boils down to features and not pure numbers for boards using the same chipset. In features, the UD7 is a mixed bag. Boot up the board, and you’ll not be greeted by a pretty-as-hell UEFI interface. Instead, it’s what Gigabyte calls a “hybrid UEFI.” It has UEFI underpinnings but the company said it stuck with its tried and true (and boring) BIOS interface. Whether you’re into UEFI or not, the most important feature today is the support of booting from partitions larger than 2TB and the UD7 is fine. Thankfully, the board booted fine from our WD 3TB Caviar drive.

Overclocking on the board was straight-laced. While the Asus would only overclock via Turbo Boost multipliers, the UD7 was old fashioned and allowed us to crank the CPU multiplier up and reboot. Like all P67 boards, we performed a mild overclock and took our 3.4GHz Core i7 2600K to 4.5GHz using a stock heat sink. All went fine, and it’s really hard to say which method works better. But we’d prefer options to do both.

Perhaps the most eye-opening feature of the GD7 is its nForce 200. Standard P67 boards can’t run more than two GPUs effectively but using the nVidia nForce 200 chip, you can run up to three GeForce cards. Standard P67 chipset boards are best suited for two GPUs, but by integrating an nForce 200 chip, the UD7 can run three double-width GPUs. We tested the UD7 using three GeForce GTX 580 cards and we weren’t disappointed. We actually found the three cards scale nicely if you run either brand new, taxing DX11 games, or if you run older games at super high resolution. One question you’ll have to ask yourself before you plunge into a board capable of running tri-SLI is whether you need it. That nForce 200 chip isn’t free and certainly contributes to the higher price of the UD7. If you’re pretty sure that you’re never going to put out the cash for three GPUs, it makes a lot more sense to buy a board without the nForce chip.

Despite its somewhat boring BIOS, there’s little to dislike on the UD7. If we were to pick something to ding Gigabyte over, it’s the lack of USB 3.0 dongles. Both MSI and Asus give you either additional rear USB 3.0 ports that plug into the onboard header or a front bay adapter with ports. Gigabyte gives you none. Considering its steep price of $320, that’s a bit of a burn.

 

Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD7

USB 3.0

Tons of USB 3.0 ports, Tri-SLI support

FIREWIRE 1600

No UEFI and no USB 3.0 adapters.

score:9

 

 

Benchmarks

Asus P8P67 Deluxe MSI P67A-GD65 Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD7
PCMark Vantage 64-bit Overall 11,250 10,388 10,556
Everest Ultimate MEM Read (MB/s) 16,110 16,492 16,501
Everest Ultimate MEM Write (MB/s) 16,757 18,602 18,592
Everest Ultimate MEM Copy (MB/s) 25,128 21,628 21,324
Everest Ultimate MEM Latency (ns) 35.8 53.5 52.3
SiSoft Sandra RAM Bandwidth (GB/s) 15.7 15.8 15.6
3DMark Vantage Overall 14,845 15,214 14,471
3DMark Vantage GPU 11,947 12,287 11,871
3DMark Vantage CPU 54,470 53,282 53,670
Valve Particle Test (fps) 180 177 178
Resident Evil 5 low-res (fps) 132
131.7 131.3
HAWX low-res (fps) 244
247 234
HD Tune Pro Sustained Write w/ Marvell 6GB/s Controller (MB/s) 208
202.4 237
HD Tune Pro Burst (MB/s) (Marvell) 157 167 174
HD Tune Pro Sustained Write w/Intel 6GB/s Controller (MB/s) 256.7 242 267.1
HD Tune Pro Burst (MB/s) (Intel) 170 204 191.2
HD Tune USB 3.0 (MB/s) 155.6 156 180

We tested all three boards using an Intel 3.4GHz Core i7 2600K, 4GB of Corsair DDR3/1333, GeForce GTX 280, 64-bit Windows 7 and WD Raptor 150GB hard drive. USB 3.0 performance testing used an OCZ Enyo drive. SATA 6Gb/s testing used a Crucial C300 SSD.

CES 2011: The Day One Wrap Up

Day one at CES has finally come to a close, and we saw a lot of things out there today. Hopefully you were following along as we shared what we found, but we don’t blame you if you missed a few videos along the way. To help you catch up, here’s a quick rundown of the many things we saw at CES 2011, Day One.

The Major Sights

We brought our very own film crew with us to CES, and they helped us capture some of the most interesting sights on the show floor. Check them out:

The Lenovo IdeaPad U1 and Slate Tablets

Lenovo shows off their shapeshifting tablet/notebook hybrid, as well as their brand new Windows 7 tablet.

 

Motorola Shows of the Xoom Tablet

Motorola walks us through their new 10.1 tablet, the Xoom.

 

The Kegputer

NVIDIA combines two of our favorite things–PC Gaming and beer–in one beautiful, unholy machine.

416×234 with html5 and api support

 

ioSafe Vs. the Shotgun

Senior Associate Editor Nathan Edwards teams up with Mac|Life’s Roberto Baldwin to put ioSafe’s “indestructible” HDD to the ultimate test.

405×287 with html5 and api support

 

Going Rogue

Fancy video from the film crew is nice and all, but we know that sometimes what you want is just a quick look at what our editors are seeing on the show floor at CES. The following videos were shot guerilla-style, using handheld cams as we walked the floor.

Panasonic Viera

416×234 with html5 and api support

 

Sharp Quattron

 

Motorola Atrix 4G

416×234 with html5 and api support

 

Kitara Digital Guitar

 

ViewSonic All-In-One PCs

416×234 with html5 and api support

 

Click here for more news and videos about CES 2011, the biggest event in consumer electronics!

Day one at CES has finally come to a close, and we saw a lot of things out there today. Hopefully you were following along as we shared what we found, but we don’t blame you if you missed a few videos along the way. To help you catch up, here’s a quick rundown of the many things we saw at CES 2011, Day One.

The Major Sights

We brought our very own film crew with us to CES, and they helped us capture some of the most interesting sights on the show floor. Check them out:

The Lenovo IdeaPad U1 and Slate Tablets

Lenovo shows off their shapeshifting tablet/notebook hybrid, as well as their brand new Windows 7 tablet.

 

Motorola Shows of the Xoom Tablet

Motorola walks us through their new 10.1 tablet, the Xoom.

 

The Kegputer

NVIDIA combines two of our favorite things–PC Gaming and beer–in one beautiful, unholy machine.

416×234 with html5 and api support

 

ioSafe Vs. the Shotgun

Senior Associate Editor Nathan Edwards teams up with Mac|Life’s Roberto Baldwin to put ioSafe’s “indestructible” HDD to the ultimate test.

405×287 with html5 and api support

 

Going Rogue

Fancy video from the film crew is nice and all, but we know that sometimes what you want is just a quick look at what our editors are seeing on the show floor at CES. The following videos were shot guerilla-style, using handheld cams as we walked the floor.

Panasonic Viera

416×234 with html5 and api support

 

Sharp Quattron

 

Motorola Atrix 4G

416×234 with html5 and api support

 

Kitara Digital Guitar

 

ViewSonic All-In-One PCs

416×234 with html5 and api support

 

Click here for more news and videos about CES 2011, the biggest event in consumer electronics!

Geek Gift Week: Editors Wish List

With every day we get closer to that giant, consumer-crazy holiday-which-must-not-be-named, and we’ve decided to get you pumped for the caroling, egg nog and tree decorating (or bourbon, snow ball fights and holiday specials on tv) with a week’s wo…

With every day we get closer to that giant, consumer-crazy holiday-which-must-not-be-named, and we’ve decided to get you pumped for the caroling, egg nog and tree decorating (or bourbon, snow ball fights and holiday specials on tv) with a week’s worth of geekery, gifts and gadgets.  In the spirit of Old School Monday’s Lust Lists of yesteryear, we decided to poll the Max PC staff for an updated version of what they’re coveting for the holiday. First up, everyone’s favorite podcast star:

Gordon Mah Ung, Senior Reviews Editor

Alienware M11x.

My laptop is embarrassing. I’m still using the same IBM Thinkpad T60 that I’ve had for four years. It’s a testament to the sturdy Thinkpads but it’s also getting pretty tired. If I had the cash to burn this Christmas, I’d seriously think about an Alienware M11x notebook. I like the idea of having better graphics in an ultra-portable machine. Plus, those M11x notebooks are frakking sweet looking too.

$799
Dell.com

George Jones, Editor in Chief

Amazon Kindle

I was home in Los Angeles for Thanksgiving, and marveled at the fact that of the 6 members of my family, 5 of us have Kindles. Then I spied my brother’s brand new Kindle. I am literally dying of envy. He tells me that the battery life is at least 3x the battery life of the 2nd Kindle. The E ink is clearer, and built in Wi-Fi means you don’t have to constantly rely on a 3G signal. Plus, it’s now black/gray instead of white, so no more finger smudges.

$189
Amazon.com

Also on the list: Acer Iconia Dual Screen Tablet. I initially viewed Acer’s crazy-looking dual screen Windows tablet/laptop with skepticism. Then I got my hands on the device and immediately deemed it lustworthy. From a hardware perspective, it’s surprisingly refined, and the presence of Windows 7 makes it far more functional than most tablets. Say what you will about this thing, but the moment you see it, you’ll want it. (For a private video I captured at Acer’s latest event, click here.)

Amber Bouman, Online Features Editor

bitfenix Survivor

Since my OEM laptop is officially kaput, I am officially PC-less. I’ve been working from an external hard drive and a smartphone but I want to build my own rig. So far, the only piece I know I must have is the bitfenix Survivor. I can’t stop touching the SofTouch Surface (yep, that’s me that Nathan is calling out in the Survivor review in the January issue). I also really like the LED-lit logo on the front, dig the shape and the concealed I/O panel.  It’s a slick start to my very own dream machine. Next up on the wish list – several additional fans for this beauty.

  $110

Bitfenix.com

Jon Phillips, Editorial Director

A 10.1-Inch Android Tablet

Having just finished my testing of two pretty-good-but-not-awesome 7-inch Android tablets, I’m looking forward to getting my mitts on one of the upcoming 10.1-inch devices that should be showing at CES 2011 in January. Sure, a tablet with a 7-inch screen is lighter to hold, but are tech nerds really such weaklings that they can’t support a 10.1-inch screen in their carpal-tunnel-afflicted hands? Toshiba, Velocity Micro and Acer should all be shipping these potential iPad killers next year, and I want not just one of them, but rather all damn three. Sweetening the deals could be the implementation on Nvidia’s dual-core Tegra 2 mobile processor in some of next year’s tablet offerings. The Tegra 2 should absolutely scream in the tablet formfactor.

Acer Android Tablet – not yet available.

 Nathan Edwards, Senior Associate Editor

Xbox 360 Slim 250GB version

My home PC is still plenty powerful; it’s my entertainment system that needs work. I game on PC, but I used my Xbox 360 to watch DVDs, use Netflix Instant Watch, and stream music and movies from my PC to my TV. Until last month, when it red-ringed. The new Xbox outputs in 1080p, so I’ll need an HDTV, too. And I can’t just use its built-in speakers; I need some surround sound. And a Blu-ray player. And a receiver. And a bigger house. And a money tree.

$299

www.xbox.com

Alan Fackler, Associate Editor

Samsung Galaxy Tablet

I’d give my left arm for the Samsung Galaxy Tablet.  Sure it’s not as big as the iPad, but I’ve had some time with our review unit, and it’s a snappy little device none-the-less.  My smartphone handles my on-the-go computing, so I’d take one with wi-fi only and just use it around the house. 

$600 (off contract)
www.samsung.com

Michael Brown, Reviews Editor

Onkyo TX-NR1008

Santa, I’ve been a really, really good editor this year. I hit all my deadlines, steered my readers toward good products (and pointed out which ones they should avoid). How about putting Onkyo’s new TX-NR1008 A/V receiver under my tree this year? It supports HDMI 1.4a, so it can play Blu-ray 3D movies; it has two HDMI outputs, so I can use both my HDTV and my video projector without having to do a reach-around ; and it even has an HDMI input on its front panel, so I can plug in my digital camcorder. Most importantly, it sounds absolutely divine.

$1,400
www.onkyousa.com

Alex Castle, Online Managing Editor

Bowers & Wilkins MM-1 Computer Speakers

 

As the gaming headset reviewer for Maximum PC, I’m lucky enough to get to keep some of the best headsets on the market for use at home. The downside of this is that, when I take the headphones off and want to play a game, a movie, or some music out loud, I don’t have any speakers that are up to producing the same kind sound I get from, say, the Sennheiser 333D headset.

That’s why I want a pair of our best-of-the-best computer speakers, the Bowers & Wilkins MM1s. My studio apartment (and fun-sized desk) doesn’t need anything bigger for my computer, and I like the look of the MM-1s. Of course, at $450, they’re way out of my price range, but this is a WISH list, right?

$450

www.bowers-wilkins.com