Sony Bravia KDL-46EX503 review

Sony’s restructured its Bravia TVs. With stark black styling and hard edges this 1080p set is from its EX (Essentials) range. It looks quite cool from the front, but at 10cm deep, it’s quite fat and looks clunky next to sleek lines of the Samsung UE46C7000. This is because there’s no fancy LED backlight, just plain CCFL, and as this is Sony’s affordable model, there’s no 3D functionality either. It does have some other interesting features though.

The Freeview HD tuner means free HD channels for starters and the disappointing Applicast feature of last year has been replaced by the truly excellent Bravia Internet TV, which is the best web TV service we’ve seen. It includes a raft of genuinely useful online apps from the likes of YouTube, Daily Motion and Singing Fool, while Demand Five also lets you catch up on the latest Neighbours and Home and Away. LoveFilm, another free app, is currently offering 69 films for download in HD for instance. There are four USBs and you can also stream media from a PC and access files on a USB device, just like most mid to high-end TVs in fact, but the difference here is the superb PlayStation-style XMB interface that makes it all so fast and easy to access.

 

——————————————————-

More on Sony home cinema

Sony RHT-G500 review

Sony DMP-BD760 in T3 Hot 100

Sony BDP-S470 3D Blu-ray player

———————————————————

 

 

Picture quality

 

Sony’s powerful Bravia Engine 3 is the video processor with 100Hz motion processing that ensures the picture always looks smooth and sharply resolved without introducing any unnatural artefacts. It also does a fine job of accurately upscaling sketchy standard def material to fit the screen.

 

The contrast ratio is enough to resolve the difficult darker scenes, but the blacks don’t look quite as inky black as they do on some similarly priced sets simply can’t compete with the bright colour palette of the Sharp LC-LE821E LED-lit panel. That said, it does achieve a natural colour balance, that makes grass look a realistic shade of green and there’s a wide enough colour gamut to avoid colour banding.

 

And unlike some of the super slim sets, the audio here measures up to the screen size thanks to the S-Force stereo speakers, which are reasonably powerful and manage a pseudo surround mode that stretches the sound back into the room.

It’s not the best-looking set in Sony’s range, but at £1200, this mid-priced model has the same great usability and blend of useful features that should make it a popular choice this year.

 

Link: Sony


Sony’s restructured its Bravia TVs. With stark black styling and hard edges this 1080p set is from its EX (Essentials) range. It looks quite cool from the front, but at 10cm deep, it’s quite fat and looks clunky next to sleek lines of the Samsung UE46C7000. This is because there’s no fancy LED backlight, just plain CCFL, and as this is Sony’s affordable model, there’s no 3D functionality either. It does have some other interesting features though.

The Freeview HD tuner means free HD channels for starters and the disappointing Applicast feature of last year has been replaced by the truly excellent Bravia Internet TV, which is the best web TV service we’ve seen. It includes a raft of genuinely useful online apps from the likes of YouTube, Daily Motion and Singing Fool, while Demand Five also lets you catch up on the latest Neighbours and Home and Away. LoveFilm, another free app, is currently offering 69 films for download in HD for instance. There are four USBs and you can also stream media from a PC and access files on a USB device, just like most mid to high-end TVs in fact, but the difference here is the superb PlayStation-style XMB interface that makes it all so fast and easy to access.

 

——————————————————-

More on Sony home cinema

Sony RHT-G500 review

Sony DMP-BD760 in T3 Hot 100

Sony BDP-S470 3D Blu-ray player

———————————————————

 

 

Picture quality

 

Sony’s powerful Bravia Engine 3 is the video processor with 100Hz motion processing that ensures the picture always looks smooth and sharply resolved without introducing any unnatural artefacts. It also does a fine job of accurately upscaling sketchy standard def material to fit the screen.

 

The contrast ratio is enough to resolve the difficult darker scenes, but the blacks don’t look quite as inky black as they do on some similarly priced sets simply can’t compete with the bright colour palette of the Sharp LC-LE821E LED-lit panel. That said, it does achieve a natural colour balance, that makes grass look a realistic shade of green and there’s a wide enough colour gamut to avoid colour banding.

 

And unlike some of the super slim sets, the audio here measures up to the screen size thanks to the S-Force stereo speakers, which are reasonably powerful and manage a pseudo surround mode that stretches the sound back into the room.

It’s not the best-looking set in Sony’s range, but at £1200, this mid-priced model has the same great usability and blend of useful features that should make it a popular choice this year.

 

Link: Sony


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *