Sharp LC-LE821E review

Fresh from the brand new Japanese plant, Sharp’s X-Gen panels introduce a radical new alternative to the RGB display. Instead of the usual red, green and blue sub pixels, Sharp has thrown yellow into the mix too. No, we hadn’t noticed is absence either, but the fourth colour brings genuine improvements to greens, golds and of course yellows with smoother transitions between shades.

 

The bright LED backlight also makes the colours pop on this big 46-inch screen. It’s using Edge LED backlighting to keep the depth of the set below 4cm. It means you see a brighter image than with a CCFL backlight and there’s another unexpected benefit of the yellow fourth pixel, which is that it lets more light through than the darker colours. This means an even brighter panel, with exceptionally low energy consumption. At this price though, we might have expected to see a local dimming backlight being used, which are great for emphasizing dark shapes on a light background, but that seems to be the reserve of the very top-end TVs.

 

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More on Sharp

Sharp Aquos LE920

Sharp Aquos Net

——————————–

 

Freeview HD Ready

 

This is a Full HD set with a Freeview HD tuner, so it’s all set for live football in glorious high definition. There’s so much crisp detail on this screen, you can really see the emotion on the crowd’s faces when you pause the action.

 

It can’t quite match the really dark blacks you get from some Panasonic plasmas and it looks overly bright on it’s factory settings, but tweak the many settings in its helpful onscreen menu and you’ll have a vivid and engaging picture that’s perfect for a big match.

 

Sharp has blessed this set with a reasonable pair of 10 Watt speakers and a mini ‘subwoofer’ that manages a decent audio output. You can switch it into Dolby Digital Plus surround for some extra ambience and crowd noise.

 

Extra features

 

Sharp’s doesn’t offer any online widgetery. Instead an Ethernet port is used for firmware updates and using its DLNA protocol to stream music and movies from your PC. Without the slick interface we’ve seen from Sony and a somewhat clunky remote control, this is a bit of an effort though. Much more useful is the TimeShift function that allows you to record up to half an hour of high def footage onto the integrated hard drive. Very clever. Connectivity includees four HDMI connections and two Scart, but unlike the Samsung UE46C7000 it’s not 3D ready.

 

Sharp’s handsome set is more about the seamless glass design and enticing picture quality than bells and whistles, which will suit the purist footy fan and makes up for the high price and modest feature set.
 

Link: Sharp


Fresh from the brand new Japanese plant, Sharp’s X-Gen panels introduce a radical new alternative to the RGB display. Instead of the usual red, green and blue sub pixels, Sharp has thrown yellow into the mix too. No, we hadn’t noticed is absence either, but the fourth colour brings genuine improvements to greens, golds and of course yellows with smoother transitions between shades.

 

The bright LED backlight also makes the colours pop on this big 46-inch screen. It’s using Edge LED backlighting to keep the depth of the set below 4cm. It means you see a brighter image than with a CCFL backlight and there’s another unexpected benefit of the yellow fourth pixel, which is that it lets more light through than the darker colours. This means an even brighter panel, with exceptionally low energy consumption. At this price though, we might have expected to see a local dimming backlight being used, which are great for emphasizing dark shapes on a light background, but that seems to be the reserve of the very top-end TVs.

 

——————————-

More on Sharp

Sharp Aquos LE920

Sharp Aquos Net

——————————–

 

Freeview HD Ready

 

This is a Full HD set with a Freeview HD tuner, so it’s all set for live football in glorious high definition. There’s so much crisp detail on this screen, you can really see the emotion on the crowd’s faces when you pause the action.

 

It can’t quite match the really dark blacks you get from some Panasonic plasmas and it looks overly bright on it’s factory settings, but tweak the many settings in its helpful onscreen menu and you’ll have a vivid and engaging picture that’s perfect for a big match.

 

Sharp has blessed this set with a reasonable pair of 10 Watt speakers and a mini ‘subwoofer’ that manages a decent audio output. You can switch it into Dolby Digital Plus surround for some extra ambience and crowd noise.

 

Extra features

 

Sharp’s doesn’t offer any online widgetery. Instead an Ethernet port is used for firmware updates and using its DLNA protocol to stream music and movies from your PC. Without the slick interface we’ve seen from Sony and a somewhat clunky remote control, this is a bit of an effort though. Much more useful is the TimeShift function that allows you to record up to half an hour of high def footage onto the integrated hard drive. Very clever. Connectivity includees four HDMI connections and two Scart, but unlike the Samsung UE46C7000 it’s not 3D ready.

 

Sharp’s handsome set is more about the seamless glass design and enticing picture quality than bells and whistles, which will suit the purist footy fan and makes up for the high price and modest feature set.
 

Link: Sharp


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