Nintendo 3DS review: Hands-on pictures and video

The hype and anticipation surrounding the Nintendo 3DS its announcement at E3 earlier this year, and the prospect of glasses-less portable 3D gaming, is of proportions unrivalled by the gaming industry in recent years.

 

As eager as anyone to try Nintendo’s tantalising offering of portable 3D gaming, T3 today jumped at the chance of a hands-on test of the upcoming games console. Watch T3’s Chris Smith put the 3DS through its paces in the hands-on video below.

To launch the gallery of hands-on images with the Nintendo 3DS click here.

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Related Links:
Nintendo 3DS official: Glasses-free 3D gaming
Nintendo 3DS launches: First impressions
Nintendo 3DS UK launch: Rumours continue
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On first impressions, the Nintendo 3DS as a concept is a marvel of portable gaming that is not only set to bring a new dimension to pocket-sized consoles but provide innovative breakthroughs for the console market and glasses-less 3D technology. These beliefs are confirmed when the console’s 3.5-inch screen jumps into action with impeccably clear and focused 3D content, all without the need for those pesky and cumbersome 3D specs.

 

Demonstrating 3D versions of the popular DS puppy training and arcade flight simulation titles, the 3DS came into its own with thrown balls disappearing into the distance and the virtual dog’s tongue appearing to come out of the screen. The 3D capabilities of the 3DS aren’t limited to gaming, however. Thanks to its two separate lenses, the console’s built in camera offers the ability to take 3D snaps.

 

The 3D levels on the 3DS are all easily variable to users’ personal preferences, as are snapped 3D images, via the device’s 3D level slider. This slider can even be turned off by users who want to return to the two-dimensional ages or take a break from the potentially nauseating 3D gaming content.

 

Currently limiting the Nintendo 3DS, however, is its minimal viewing angles for the 3D content. Users who vary from the central, direct field of view approach will be met by a hard to distinguish, blurred image. Whether this is the price that has to be paid for glasses-less 3D gaming remains to be seen.

 

Although, Nintendo is still remaining tight lipped and cagey on the subject of a release date for the Nintendo 3DS, the general industry expectation is that portable 3D gaming will hit Japan in time for this year’s festive period before expanding globally in March of 2011.

 

For all the latest news and reviews of the upcoming Nintendo 3DS, including that all-important release date, sign up to the T3 Twitter and Facebook feeds.
 


Posted by Luke Johnson


The hype and anticipation surrounding the Nintendo 3DS its announcement at E3 earlier this year, and the prospect of glasses-less portable 3D gaming, is of proportions unrivalled by the gaming industry in recent years.

 

As eager as anyone to try Nintendo’s tantalising offering of portable 3D gaming, T3 today jumped at the chance of a hands-on test of the upcoming games console. Watch T3’s Chris Smith put the 3DS through its paces in the hands-on video below.

To launch the gallery of hands-on images with the Nintendo 3DS click here.

—————————————————————————-
Related Links:
Nintendo 3DS official: Glasses-free 3D gaming
Nintendo 3DS launches: First impressions
Nintendo 3DS UK launch: Rumours continue
—————————————————————————-

 

On first impressions, the Nintendo 3DS as a concept is a marvel of portable gaming that is not only set to bring a new dimension to pocket-sized consoles but provide innovative breakthroughs for the console market and glasses-less 3D technology. These beliefs are confirmed when the console’s 3.5-inch screen jumps into action with impeccably clear and focused 3D content, all without the need for those pesky and cumbersome 3D specs.

 

Demonstrating 3D versions of the popular DS puppy training and arcade flight simulation titles, the 3DS came into its own with thrown balls disappearing into the distance and the virtual dog’s tongue appearing to come out of the screen. The 3D capabilities of the 3DS aren’t limited to gaming, however. Thanks to its two separate lenses, the console’s built in camera offers the ability to take 3D snaps.

 

The 3D levels on the 3DS are all easily variable to users’ personal preferences, as are snapped 3D images, via the device’s 3D level slider. This slider can even be turned off by users who want to return to the two-dimensional ages or take a break from the potentially nauseating 3D gaming content.

 

Currently limiting the Nintendo 3DS, however, is its minimal viewing angles for the 3D content. Users who vary from the central, direct field of view approach will be met by a hard to distinguish, blurred image. Whether this is the price that has to be paid for glasses-less 3D gaming remains to be seen.

 

Although, Nintendo is still remaining tight lipped and cagey on the subject of a release date for the Nintendo 3DS, the general industry expectation is that portable 3D gaming will hit Japan in time for this year’s festive period before expanding globally in March of 2011.

 

For all the latest news and reviews of the upcoming Nintendo 3DS, including that all-important release date, sign up to the T3 Twitter and Facebook feeds.
 


Posted by Luke Johnson


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