Motorola Motonav TN765

The name Motorola isn’t synonymous with sat nav, instead you think of its mobile handsets: the iconic RAZR, blingy Aura and the fantastic Milestone. But the company introduced its first dedicated navigation device in 2003 and more recently, Motonav software on its handsets.

 

In a crowded market that’s seen Sony, the AA and Route 66 opt out of dedicated devices, Motorola has done something a bit different. For £100-£200 extra you can get it professionally installed in your car, adding a built-in lead so you can listen to your iPod through the speaker system, and a microphone for voice calls routed via Bluetooth. It sits somewhere between a conventional sat nav like the TomTom GO940 and an integrated system.

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More on Motorola

Motorola Milestone review

Motorola DEXT review

Motorola Backflip hands on

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First impressions centre on the 5.1inch 854×358 pixel screen. It’s exceptionally generous – only beaten by the market leading Mio Navman V705TV at 7inches – and makes it look a bit like a mobile phone. Dedicated volume buttons on the left are a welcome addition for quick adjustments, with zoom controls on the right.

 

When you’re driving the screen makes a huge difference compared to conventional systems. Multiview splits the screen enabling menu options, such as aerial view or turn-by-turn instructions, to be displayed adjacent to the maps and stil be big enough to follow. It’s slick and intuitive and probably the best interface we’ve seen on a sat nav.

 

Route planning is simple, with a great pedestrian mode alongside, bike, taxi and even bus route options. Maps are clear and easy to follow, with clear voice instructions and text to speech. Rerouting is quick too. Voice navigation is a highlight, proving very effective at recognising all our instructions. Tap the microphone button to call a contact, go home, bring up favourites and adjust the volume.


Traffic, safety cameras and bluetooth

 

Motorola’s stuffed the TN765 with a huge range of features, all quickly accessed via the one-screen menu. There’s a 90-day trial of traffic (TMC not the preferable sim-based traffic), safety cameras and MotoLive, including: Google Local Search, fuel prices, weather and flight status. Instead of a sim card, MotoLive gets information by connecting to your phone via bluetooth and placing a standard rate call, which is cheap in the UK, but could be pricey abroad. Traffic, safety camera and MotoLive cost a reasonable £30 a year each after, and by selling them individually at least Motorola gives you the choice of what you services you need.

 

Opt for the integrated solution and the TN765 becomes a decent music player where you can view iPod playlists, scroll by artist and track, all via the screen.

 

With a great screen, UI and decent routing the Motorola Motonav TN765 is a fantastic sat nav. It lacks features like TomTom’s IQ Routes and sim-based traffic of the Garmin 1690T, but factor in the cheap cost of installation and it’s clear the Motonav offers something unique. For anyone who uses their car for work or drives a lot, yet has previously balked at the cost of an integrated system, the TN765 is well worth a look. If you’re not bothered about installation, it’s worth a look for the intuitive interface alone.

 

Link: Motorola
 


The name Motorola isn’t synonymous with sat nav, instead you think of its mobile handsets: the iconic RAZR, blingy Aura and the fantastic Milestone. But the company introduced its first dedicated navigation device in 2003 and more recently, Motonav software on its handsets.

 

In a crowded market that’s seen Sony, the AA and Route 66 opt out of dedicated devices, Motorola has done something a bit different. For £100-£200 extra you can get it professionally installed in your car, adding a built-in lead so you can listen to your iPod through the speaker system, and a microphone for voice calls routed via Bluetooth. It sits somewhere between a conventional sat nav like the TomTom GO940 and an integrated system.

—————————————-

More on Motorola

Motorola Milestone review

Motorola DEXT review

Motorola Backflip hands on

——————————————

 

First impressions centre on the 5.1inch 854×358 pixel screen. It’s exceptionally generous – only beaten by the market leading Mio Navman V705TV at 7inches – and makes it look a bit like a mobile phone. Dedicated volume buttons on the left are a welcome addition for quick adjustments, with zoom controls on the right.

 

When you’re driving the screen makes a huge difference compared to conventional systems. Multiview splits the screen enabling menu options, such as aerial view or turn-by-turn instructions, to be displayed adjacent to the maps and stil be big enough to follow. It’s slick and intuitive and probably the best interface we’ve seen on a sat nav.

 

Route planning is simple, with a great pedestrian mode alongside, bike, taxi and even bus route options. Maps are clear and easy to follow, with clear voice instructions and text to speech. Rerouting is quick too. Voice navigation is a highlight, proving very effective at recognising all our instructions. Tap the microphone button to call a contact, go home, bring up favourites and adjust the volume.


Traffic, safety cameras and bluetooth

 

Motorola’s stuffed the TN765 with a huge range of features, all quickly accessed via the one-screen menu. There’s a 90-day trial of traffic (TMC not the preferable sim-based traffic), safety cameras and MotoLive, including: Google Local Search, fuel prices, weather and flight status. Instead of a sim card, MotoLive gets information by connecting to your phone via bluetooth and placing a standard rate call, which is cheap in the UK, but could be pricey abroad. Traffic, safety camera and MotoLive cost a reasonable £30 a year each after, and by selling them individually at least Motorola gives you the choice of what you services you need.

 

Opt for the integrated solution and the TN765 becomes a decent music player where you can view iPod playlists, scroll by artist and track, all via the screen.

 

With a great screen, UI and decent routing the Motorola Motonav TN765 is a fantastic sat nav. It lacks features like TomTom’s IQ Routes and sim-based traffic of the Garmin 1690T, but factor in the cheap cost of installation and it’s clear the Motonav offers something unique. For anyone who uses their car for work or drives a lot, yet has previously balked at the cost of an integrated system, the TN765 is well worth a look. If you’re not bothered about installation, it’s worth a look for the intuitive interface alone.

 

Link: Motorola
 


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