Goldring GX200 review

There’s an unwritten rule in specialist audio circles that any ‘free’ cables, such as those found in the box with new kit, should be binned. It may seem harsh, it’s definitely wasteful and undoubtedly eco-unfriendly, but you can also apply for the same ‘rule’ to the headphones supplied with portable mp3 players. However much we love our iPod, the headphones aren’t class leading, in fact Sony’s X-Series Walkman is one of the few exceptions to the rule.

 

Grado’s GX200 is a fine example of why you should upgrade. It’s one of a breed of in-ear headphones that offer noise isolation, so you can enjoy more of your music with less external intrusion. And this goes two-ways: your fellow travellers won’t experience the hissy leakage from your ‘phones either, so it’s a win-win situation.

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Other headphone reviews

Radiopaq custom tuned earphones

Etymotic HF2 review

Shure SE420 review

—————————————————–

 

The GX200 ticks all of the boxes: fancy tech; great build; and first-rate sound. The Goldring brand will be familiar to audio nerds who dig turntables, and it seems the firm’s sonic credentials have filtered right down into the GX200. Thoughtfully, these earphones have been supplied with a comprehensive selection of ear buds, including the super-mouldable, memory-foam Comply tips, so getting a good fit is virtually guaranteed.

 

Build and sound

 

The main chassis is made from die-cast zinc and the part that sits right in the ear canal is well designed and feels quite natural when positioned in the ear. The ‘200 is more than just specs-appeal, however, it has one of the most natural and well-balanced outputs we’ve come across, and sometimes, we had to remind ourselves that this was a £50 product. It is especially well measured right across the frequency spectrum and sounds neutral and ‘right’ will all kinds of music, which positions the GX200 as a welcome all-rounder.

 

Goldring has specified a few other notable features that help the GX200 impress. A clever cable management system allows three routing options around the ears and neck and most importantly, it has used titanium for the drive units – a material that lends itself well to micro-sized diaphragms.

 

For £50 the ‘200 is an outstanding product, and with a selection of colours to choose from the GX200 should suit everyone.

 

Link: Goldring


There’s an unwritten rule in specialist audio circles that any ‘free’ cables, such as those found in the box with new kit, should be binned. It may seem harsh, it’s definitely wasteful and undoubtedly eco-unfriendly, but you can also apply for the same ‘rule’ to the headphones supplied with portable mp3 players. However much we love our iPod, the headphones aren’t class leading, in fact Sony’s X-Series Walkman is one of the few exceptions to the rule.

 

Grado’s GX200 is a fine example of why you should upgrade. It’s one of a breed of in-ear headphones that offer noise isolation, so you can enjoy more of your music with less external intrusion. And this goes two-ways: your fellow travellers won’t experience the hissy leakage from your ‘phones either, so it’s a win-win situation.

—————————————————

Other headphone reviews

Radiopaq custom tuned earphones

Etymotic HF2 review

Shure SE420 review

—————————————————–

 

The GX200 ticks all of the boxes: fancy tech; great build; and first-rate sound. The Goldring brand will be familiar to audio nerds who dig turntables, and it seems the firm’s sonic credentials have filtered right down into the GX200. Thoughtfully, these earphones have been supplied with a comprehensive selection of ear buds, including the super-mouldable, memory-foam Comply tips, so getting a good fit is virtually guaranteed.

 

Build and sound

 

The main chassis is made from die-cast zinc and the part that sits right in the ear canal is well designed and feels quite natural when positioned in the ear. The ‘200 is more than just specs-appeal, however, it has one of the most natural and well-balanced outputs we’ve come across, and sometimes, we had to remind ourselves that this was a £50 product. It is especially well measured right across the frequency spectrum and sounds neutral and ‘right’ will all kinds of music, which positions the GX200 as a welcome all-rounder.

 

Goldring has specified a few other notable features that help the GX200 impress. A clever cable management system allows three routing options around the ears and neck and most importantly, it has used titanium for the drive units – a material that lends itself well to micro-sized diaphragms.

 

For £50 the ‘200 is an outstanding product, and with a selection of colours to choose from the GX200 should suit everyone.

 

Link: Goldring


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