Sky Sports hit by Ofcom ruling

Ofcom has at last handed down its ruling on the price of Sky Sports. And it makes ugly reading for everyone’s favourite media mogul, Sky owner Rupert Murdoch. The media regulator has said Sky must slash its wholesale rates when flogging Sky Sports 1 and 2 to rivals such as TalkTalk, BT Vision and Top Up TV.

 

That not only means Sky’s big time competitors will have to pay less. It also means you won’t be stung as much when upgrading to a sports package if you don’t have a Sky box.

 

However, this is not the time for skinflint fans of Revista de la Liga and the tiresome Goals on Sunday to rejoice. Sky has said it’ll take this to the courts, arguing that its rivals should have been quicker out of the blocks when bidding for big time events such as the Ashes and Ryder Cup. It says using the regulator to set fees is unfair.

 

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Related links:
Sky 3D TV Premier League football preview
Best Sports Apps
Sky HD new channels incoming

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To soothe the pain, Ofcom has said Sky can go ahead with its terrestrial pay TV service, Sky Picnic, which has been on the back burner since last year.

 

That said, Ofcom has referred Sky to the dreaded Competition Commission over movie sales rights. Sky Movies had also been under investigation for unfairly cornering the market.

 

"Pay TV services have to date been delivered primarily via satellite and cable networks," said Ofcom in its report. "However, this investigation comes at a time of disruptive change in the way content is distributed.

 

"For example, digital terrestrial TV offers the scope for pay TV to be delivered via aerials, and new broadband networks could offer consumers an unprecedented choice of content, and the ability to access that content on demand.”

 

This isn’t the end. Expect Murdoch himself to wade into the debate and offer his tuppence worth soon. With The Times’s imminent paywall, the ageing colossus is still showing he dominates how we use the tech we love and need the most.

 

Via: TechRadar
 

Ofcom has at last handed down its ruling on the price of Sky Sports. And it makes ugly reading for everyone’s favourite media mogul, Sky owner Rupert Murdoch. The media regulator has said Sky must slash its wholesale rates when flogging Sky Sports 1 and 2 to rivals such as TalkTalk, BT Vision and Top Up TV.

 

That not only means Sky’s big time competitors will have to pay less. It also means you won’t be stung as much when upgrading to a sports package if you don’t have a Sky box.

 

However, this is not the time for skinflint fans of Revista de la Liga and the tiresome Goals on Sunday to rejoice. Sky has said it’ll take this to the courts, arguing that its rivals should have been quicker out of the blocks when bidding for big time events such as the Ashes and Ryder Cup. It says using the regulator to set fees is unfair.

 

————————————————–
Related links:
Sky 3D TV Premier League football preview
Best Sports Apps
Sky HD new channels incoming

————————————————–

To soothe the pain, Ofcom has said Sky can go ahead with its terrestrial pay TV service, Sky Picnic, which has been on the back burner since last year.

 

That said, Ofcom has referred Sky to the dreaded Competition Commission over movie sales rights. Sky Movies had also been under investigation for unfairly cornering the market.

 

"Pay TV services have to date been delivered primarily via satellite and cable networks," said Ofcom in its report. "However, this investigation comes at a time of disruptive change in the way content is distributed.

 

"For example, digital terrestrial TV offers the scope for pay TV to be delivered via aerials, and new broadband networks could offer consumers an unprecedented choice of content, and the ability to access that content on demand.”

 

This isn’t the end. Expect Murdoch himself to wade into the debate and offer his tuppence worth soon. With The Times’s imminent paywall, the ageing colossus is still showing he dominates how we use the tech we love and need the most.

 

Via: TechRadar
 

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