Launched Mi Notebook Air

Mi Notebook Air 13.3

Hugo Barra introduced you to Mi Notebook Air, Xiaomi’s first-ever laptop; an ultra-thin, ultra-light, all-metal beauty packed with Xiaomi-style innovations. It comes in two flavors: a 13.3” ultralight notebook with a dedicated high-performance graphics card, and a compact, magazine-sized 12.5” lightweight workhorse with an incredible battery life of 11.5 hours.

Mi Notebook Air 133

Mi Notebook Air 13.3”
– Intel Core i5 processor
– 8GB next-generation DDR4 RAM
– Expandable 256GB PCIe SSD
– NVIDIA GeForce 940MX high-performance dedicated graphics card
– Powered by Windows 10 Home
– Lightweight, full-metal body
– 9.5 hours extended battery life, supports 1C quick charging, can be charged to 50% in just 30 minutes
– 802.11ac dual-band Wi-Fi
– AKG custom grade dual speakers, supports Dolby Digital surround sound
– 5.59mm ultra-thin bezel
– Fully laminated, 1080p FHD display with edge-to-edge glass protection
– Ultra-thin, individually backlit, full-sized keyboard
– Full set of connectors: HDMI, USB 3.0 x 2, 3.5mm headphone jack, USB Type-C
– Supports Bluetooth 4.1 and can be unlocked with Mi Band 2
– 13.3” display, 309.6mm x 210.9mm x 14.8mm; 1.28kg
– Mi Cloud Sync ready
– Logoless exterior, clean minimalistic design
RMB 4999

Mi Notebook Air 125

 

Mi Notebook Air 12.5”
– Ultra-light full metal body, 12.9mm thin, weighs only 1.07kg
– 11.5 hours battery life, supports 1C quick charging
– Intel Core M3 processor
– 4GB RAM
– Expandable 128GB SATA SSD
– powered by Windows 10 Home
– 1080p FHD screen with edge-to-edge glass protection
– AKG custom dual speakers, Dolby digital surround sound
– Mi Cloud Sync ready
– RMB 3499

Dell to Begin Fixing Alienware M11x Hinge Issue in March

With a growing number of Alienware M11x notebook owners complaining about faulty hinges on the machine, Dell is now planning to introduce a “hinge fix program” in a bid to placate these worried, and often indignant, M11x-R1/R2 customers.
“We a…

With a growing number of Alienware M11x notebook owners complaining about faulty hinges on the machine, Dell is now planning to introduce a “hinge fix program” in a bid to placate these worried, and often indignant, M11x-R1/R2 customers.

“We apologize for this process taking so long. We have an ETA around March for when the M11x-R1/R2 Hinge fix program will be started,” wrote Chris M, Dell’s forum liaison, on the Alienware forum. However, a start date range for the program has yet to be finalized and depends on a third-party vendor.

“When it does begin, all who have the hinge defect will get it repaired regardless of the warranty end date. We know that you deserve the re-designed Hinge and we will make it happen.”

While this latest announcement from Dell is sure to comfort worried customers, the fact is the company has already taken far too long to come up with a fix. The last time the PC vendor assured everyone that its “relevant internal teams” were looking into the matter was back in November, 2010. As it turns out, they are still at it.

Using Google’s Chrome OS Laptop of the Future [Video]

The Chrome Cr-48 netbook might just be a reference design—as in, most folks won’t ever be able to use it—but it is what Google thinks a Chrome laptop should be. And it has some pre…

Asus G73Jw-A1 Review

Featuring Nvidia’s new GeForce GTX 460M graphics
A 17-inch notebook is going to be big, there’s just no way around it. But after reviewing Malibal’s ginormous X7200 desktop replacement in our Holiday issue, Asus’s eight-pound, 11.8-ounce G73Jw-A1…

Featuring Nvidia’s new GeForce GTX 460M graphics

A 17-inch notebook is going to be big, there’s just no way around it. But after reviewing Malibal’s ginormous X7200 desktop replacement in our Holiday issue, Asus’s eight-pound, 11.8-ounce G73Jw-A1 seems highly portable by comparison. And at $1,800—one-third the price of the X7200—the G73Jw-A1 also seems highly affordable.

You get a lot of notebook for that price. At its center is a Core i7-740 quad-core mobile CPU, with a base clock of 1.73GHz and Turbo Boost potential up to 2.93GHz. Asus kicks that up a notch with a one-button overclock feature called Twin Turbo Mode, which pushes the CPU as much as 100MHz higher. According to Asus, Twin Turbo’s impact is most noticeable in multithreaded apps. And we did see a 6 percent difference when running MainConcept with and without Twin Turbo. But we also observed a similar difference in scores when we ran Photoshop, a mostly single-threaded app, both ways. Hey, we’ll take any extra performance we can get.

When the G73Jw-A1 is closed, you can see how the matte black finish and a few strategically designed edges and angles remind us of a stealth fighter.

Running all of our benchmarks with the help of Twin Turbo, the G73Jw-A1 enjoyed generous leads over our zero-point notebook in all the content-creation apps. It also surpassed our zero-point in the gaming benchmarks; although, here the more relevant factor was the notebook’s Nvidia GeForce GTX 460M GPU—a new Fermi-based mobile part. While this card turned out superior scores to the GeForce GTX 260M in our zero-point rig, the benchmark numbers in Far Cry 2 and Call of Duty 4 were pretty close to what we’ve seen from the last-gen GeForce GTX 285M. The big difference is that the G73Jw-A1’s GPU supports DX11. Based on the frame rates we achieved in our aged games, you’ll need to dial down resolutions and effects to make newer games playable—a common compromise in gaming notebooks, particularly those with just a single graphics card.

The G73Jw-A1 comes equipped for HD movie viewing, as well, with a 17.3-inch LED backlit screen that supports a 1920×1080 resolution, perfect for playing Blu-ray movies on the notebook’s combo drive. The G73Jw-A1
also has a decent sound system. It doesn’t compare to the audio quality you’ll get from an external set of speakers or a good set of headphones, but the presence of a subwoofer gives the G73Jw-A1 a much richer sound than you typically get from laptop speakers, and the volume gets pretty loud.

Physically, the G73Jw-A1 is solid. Its matte finish mitigates unsightly fingerprints and its rubberized palm rest area feels pleasant. We also like the full-size chiclet-style keyboard, which is backlit for greater visibility in dark environments. And folks who want to get under the hood will appreciate that a single access panel and two screws are the only things standing between you and three RAM slots, both drive bays, and the wireless card.
 
While we gave the Malibal X7200 high marks for its audacity, Asus’s G73Jw-A1 deserves praise for being a strong performer in a far more practical, portable, and affordable package.

ASUS G73JW-A1

MELODIOUS

Quad-core i7; DX11 graphics; decent sound system; HD screen.

MALODOROUS

You’ll need to dial down detail to play newer games.

score:9ka