Amazon Prime Music Launched

Amazon on Wednesday launched its Prime Music service in India. Amazon Prime Music will be available as part of the company’s Prime membership. This makes the service accessible to users on Android and iOS apps, desktop and web player, Fire TV sticks and Echo devices. Amazon Prime membership is available at Rs 999 per year.

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  • Amazon Music App for Android – If the Amazon Prime Music application isn’t pre-installed on your device, you can install it from the Amazon Appstore or Google Play – just search for “Amazon Music.”You can also open Amazon Prime Music Apps from your device’s mobile web browser to download the app from the Amazon Prime Music installation page.
  •  Amazon Music for iPhone, iPad & iPod touch – You can install the Amazon Prime Music app from the App Store–just search “Amazon Music” to find the app.
  • Amazon Music for PC & Mac – Amazon Prime Music for PC and Mac is a desktop application you can install on your computer to play Amazon Prime Music and music already stored on your computer.
  • Play Music on Multiple Echo Devices – You can see your compatible Echo devices during setup for Multi-Room Music.

 

Bing Audio, Windows Phone’s built-in music matching service, rolls out to 14 new countries

I was watching an old episode of Breaking Bad the other day when they played this soulful tune I couldn’t quite place. I just knew I loved it and wanted to hear it again. So I pulled out my phone and fired up Bing Audio, the built-in feature for identifying any artist, song, or album that’s playing around you.

Boom. Moments later my phone had the answer: The track was “Didn’t I,” from some semi-obscure ‘70s-era musician named Darondo. He’s now the star of my music collection.

Bing Audio is one of those Windows Phone features that, once you know it’s there, you find yourself using all the time. (Yes, I’m the weird guy waving my phone in the air at coffee shops and bars, inside the car, and in front of the TV.) The good news is that now more of you will have a chance to try it. Bing Audio support for Windows Phone has started rolling out to 14 new countries including Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, and Switzerland. The feature is already available in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the U.K., and the U.S.

If you’ve never used it before, here’s how Bing Audio works: When you hear something playing you want to identify, just tap the Search button on your phone, then tap the little music note icon shown below.

 wp_ss_20130702_0001wp_ss_20130702_0002wp_ss_20130702_0006

The phone listens for a few moments, and then lets you know if it finds an audio match. Here’s another tip: If you ever want to go back and see a song Bing Audio identified in the past, just go to Music History, which you’ll find by tapping the Search button, then tapping open the More menu.

wp_ss_20130702_0004wp_ss_20130702_0005

Of course, some people swear by popular music recognition apps like Shazam and SoundHound, which you’ll find in the Windows Phone Store (it’s always nice to have choices). But in my mind Bing Audio has a couple things going for it. First, it’s built in, so you can start using it right of the box—no downloading necessary. Second, it’s tied into Xbox Music. So once you identify a track, it’s easy to quickly buy the song or preview others from the same artist. Just tap the Store icon shown in the screenshot above. Xbox Music Pass subscribers (I’m one) can also stream or download the tune to their phones.

So next time you’re stumped on a song, give it a shot. And if you’re curious how Bing Audio performs this neat trick, check out this Q&A I did with some of the engineers who worked on it.

I was watching an old episode of Breaking Bad the other day when they played this soulful tune I couldn’t quite place. I just knew I loved it and wanted to hear it again. So I pulled out my phone and fired up Bing Audio, the built-in feature for identifying any artist, song, or album that’s playing around you.

Boom. Moments later my phone had the answer: The track was “Didn’t I,” from some semi-obscure ‘70s-era musician named Darondo. He’s now the star of my music collection.

Bing Audio is one of those Windows Phone features that, once you know it’s there, you find yourself using all the time. (Yes, I’m the weird guy waving my phone in the air at coffee shops and bars, inside the car, and in front of the TV.) The good news is that now more of you will have a chance to try it. Bing Audio support for Windows Phone has started rolling out to 14 new countries including Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, and Switzerland. The feature is already available in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the U.K., and the U.S.

If you’ve never used it before, here’s how Bing Audio works: When you hear something playing you want to identify, just tap the Search button on your phone, then tap the little music note icon shown below.

 wp_ss_20130702_0001wp_ss_20130702_0002wp_ss_20130702_0006

The phone listens for a few moments, and then lets you know if it finds an audio match. Here’s another tip: If you ever want to go back and see a song Bing Audio identified in the past, just go to Music History, which you’ll find by tapping the Search button, then tapping open the More menu.

wp_ss_20130702_0004wp_ss_20130702_0005

Of course, some people swear by popular music recognition apps like Shazam and SoundHound, which you’ll find in the Windows Phone Store (it’s always nice to have choices). But in my mind Bing Audio has a couple things going for it. First, it’s built in, so you can start using it right of the box—no downloading necessary. Second, it’s tied into Xbox Music. So once you identify a track, it’s easy to quickly buy the song or preview others from the same artist. Just tap the Store icon shown in the screenshot above. Xbox Music Pass subscribers (I’m one) can also stream or download the tune to their phones.

So next time you’re stumped on a song, give it a shot. And if you’re curious how Bing Audio performs this neat trick, check out this Q&A I did with some of the engineers who worked on it.

Spotify To Launch in the US Soon, For Real This Time

It feels like we’ve been hearing the same song and dance regarding Spotify’s US launch for months now. It’s always just over the horizon. An email sent to All Things D is at least tacit confirmation that a launch is imminent. The message was sent to …

spotifyIt feels like we’ve been hearing the same song and dance regarding Spotify’s US launch for months now. It’s always just over the horizon. An email sent to All Things D is at least tacit confirmation that a launch is imminent. The message was sent to the few Us users of Spotify test accounts to let them know they’re going to have to start paying up. The email also said that a US launch was coming “over the coming months”. Well, at least they didn’t say years.

The problem is getting deals worked out with the record labels. An EMI deal is expected to close any time, and things are looking up for Universal. Spotify has been seeding the media elite with test accounts to drum up support for the service, and it seems to be working. People are still clambering for Spotify despite several music streaming services in the US.

Free users of Spotify get mobile streaming, ad-free playback, and unlimited tunes. For this, they pay about $13.50 per month. The free version limits the number of tracks per month, and has occasional ads. Millions use the service in Europe, do you think it can still find an audience here?

How to wirelessly sync Android devices with AirSync for doubleTwist

If you’re looking for an easy way to wirelessly sync content from your Android device with your PC or Mac, you can now do so using a new feature called ‘AirSync’ in the latest version of doubleTwist. By downloading the doubleTwist Android app, along with the doubleTwist desktop client for PC or Mac, you can... Read More…

If you’re looking for an easy way to wirelessly sync content from your Android device with your PC or Mac, you can now do so using a new feature called ‘AirSync’ in the latest version of doubleTwist.

By downloading the doubleTwist Android app, along with the doubleTwist desktop client for PC or Mac, you can wirelessly sync your videos, photos, and iTunes playlists over your Wi-Fi network. Below are instructions for setting up the feature on your device.

How to set up AirSync:

1.Launch doubleTwist Android app

2.Click “AirSync” icon to upgrade

3.Follow on-screen instructions to pair your device with the desktop client

4.Once you have paired your device with your computer, you can now manage and sync your content wirelessly in the iTunes-like doubleTwist desktop application. When you open the Android app on your phone, your device should appear in the left hand pane, the same as if it was plugged in (image below).

The doubleTwist Android app can be downloaded for free from the Android Market and you can grab the desktop client for PC or Mac here. However, the AirSync feature itself will cost you $0.99 if you are one of the first 10,000 to download it, everyone else will have to pay $4.99.

[doubleTwist via Engadget]

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