Intel 510 Series SATA3 SSD Coming March 1st

The folks over at VR-Zone seem to have it on good authority that Intel is planning to launch its new 510 series SSD on the first of next month. Codenamed Elm Crest, Intel is going all out with its first 6GB/s SATA3 SSD, which is being targeted at the h…

The folks over at VR-Zone seem to have it on good authority that Intel is planning to launch its new 510 series SSD on the first of next month. Codenamed Elm Crest, Intel is going all out with its first 6GB/s SATA3 SSD, which is being targeted at the high-end crowd. It will come in two capacities at launch, 120GB and 250GB, both in a 2.5-inch, 9mm form factor.

Intel’s rating the 510 series at up to 470MB/s read and up to 315MB/s write speeds, though it’s unclear if those numbers apply to both drives. Same family SSDs have been known to offer up different performance levels depending on the capacity.

The 510 series also boasts up to 20,000 4K random reads and up to 5,000 4K random writes, and is compatible with Intel’s 6-series chipset. Look for the 120GB version to sell for around $280 and the 250GB for around $580, VR-Zone says.

$200 Million National Broadband Map Shows Spotty Coverage

The Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) posted the first public, searchable, and interactive nationwide map of broadband Internet availability on Thursday. It took about $200 million in funding to …

The Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) posted the first public, searchable, and interactive nationwide map of broadband Internet availability on Thursday. It took about $200 million in funding to create the map, which serves up a database of over 25 million documents detailing the type, speed, provider, and location of broadband service across the U.S. You can see from the map that the further west you go, the more spotty the coverage.

“The National Broadband Map shows there are still too many people and community institutions lacking the level of broadband service needed to fully participate in the Internet economy,” said Lawrence Strickling, head of the NTIA.

Up to 10 percent of U.S. homes, most of which are in rural areas, don’t have access to basic broadband, the map reveals. At the same time, broadband adoption has increased to 68 percent of U.S. homes, up from 63.5 percent in 2009.

You can view the interactive map here.

Intel’s 10-Core Xeon Processor Shipping Soon

Intel’s 8-core Nehalem-EX will be shoved aside as the chip maker’s fastest server chip, conceding the performance crown to Westmere-EX, a 10-core Xeon processor. One of the talking heads at Intel said you can expect Westmere-EX to land in servers somet…

Intel’s 8-core Nehalem-EX will be shoved aside as the chip maker’s fastest server chip, conceding the performance crown to Westmere-EX, a 10-core Xeon processor. One of the talking heads at Intel said you can expect Westmere-EX to land in servers sometime in the first half of 2011, PCWorld reports. What isn’t yet known is exactly how fast it will come clocked, only that it will outpace Nehalem-EX with two additional cores and improved latency.

As you might imagine, Westmere-EX is intended for high performance servers that need the additional horsepower, such as data centers maintaining large databases. Each of Westmere-EX’s cores can run two threads, and since it will run in servers with up to eight sockets, there’s potential for 160 simultaneous threads.

The 10-core Xeon chip is built using a 32nm manufacturing process, down from Nehalem-EX’s 45nm, and is socket compatible with existing Nehalem-EX chips.

Nvidia Downplays Sandy Bridge Snafu, Praises Intel

Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang said Nvidia has been virtually unaffected by Intel’s initially flawed 6-series chipset and is still on the same schedule to ship Sandy Bridge-based products, CNet reports. Huang made the comments during a conference call earli…

Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang said Nvidia has been virtually unaffected by Intel’s initially flawed 6-series chipset and is still on the same schedule to ship Sandy Bridge-based products, CNet reports. Huang made the comments during a conference call earlier ths week, and in a change of pace from what we’ve come to expect from the candidly outspoken CEO, he even heaped on a bit of praise for the company he once promised to “open a can of whoop-ass” on.

After reassuring investors that Nvidia has “not experienced a disruption so far,” Huang went on to say he thinks “Intel is a doing quite a good job helping everyone cover.”

Everyone, including OEMs, were caught off guard by the Sandy Bridge snafu, and Intel was quick to issue a recall. The chip maker later agreed to ship boards to OEMs who promised to only use the non-affected SATA 0/1 ports when configuring systems, and Intel has been scrambling to get updated silicon into the hands of of system builders. Point being, there’s truth to what Huang is saying, we just didn’t expect it coming from Nvidia. The Nvidia of old — the one that existed before the two sides buried the hatchet for $1.5 billion and finally hammered out a new licensing agreement — would have pounced on the Sandy Bridge situation with entertaining sound bites. And now? “Intel is doing quite a good job.” Color us a little disappointed.

Ookla: AT&T iPhone 4 Faster than Verizon in 3G Tests

AT&T lost its exclusivity grip on the on the iPhone 4 when Verizon started carrying the Apple device earlier this month, but if it comes as any consolation, the wireless carrier won Ookla’s head-to-head broadband tests, Wired reports. You may recog…

AT&T lost its exclusivity grip on the on the iPhone 4 when Verizon started carrying the Apple device earlier this month, but if it comes as any consolation, the wireless carrier won Ookla’s head-to-head broadband tests, Wired reports. You may recognize Ookla as the team behind Speedtest.net, an online broadband metric. Ookla recently turned its attention to the iPhone 4 by compiling data from iPhone users who downloaded and ran the mobile version of Speedtest.

The average download speed on AT&T, as represented by 43,000 AT&T iPhone 4 owners, was 1,769Kbps and the average upload speed was 730Kbps. The former is twice as fast as was reported by Verizon’s 14,000 customers, whose average download speed was 848Kbps (average upload was 506Kbps).

“I think that’s the story I expected to see,” said Doug Sutties, co-founder of Ookla. “Verizon has never talked up their speed, but they always talk up their coverage and reliability. I think the story is quality versus throughput. What are you after?”

Good question, and we’ll pass it on to you. Which do you value more? Sound off in the comments section below!