Sony Ericsson Elm review

The Elm (J10i2) is the latest addition to Sony Ericsson’s GreenHeart range. It’s a mid-range mobile phone with Facebook and Twitter integration, at a price rivalling the LG Cookie (£100) and Nokia 5800 Xpress Music (£190). With the same human curvature design as the Vivaz, it’s an attractive handset. It’s comfortable to use and the body is lightweight plastic, which is expected at this price.

 

As well as a much smaller box, the Elm’s eco credentials include a digital instead of paper manual and a power-friendly charger. It’s partly made from recycled plastics, and less hazardous chemicals have been used during the manufacturing process.

 

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More on Sony Ericsson

Sony Ericsson Vivaz review

Sony Ericsson X10 hands on

Sony Ericsson Xperia Pureness review

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Social networking

 

The widget manger application integrates social networking websites, so Facebook, Twitter and My Space feeds are all on the blue standby screen accessed by the up arrow, it’s really useful to have all the apps together, but remember it uses your phones data to update, so check your tariff.

 

Facebook displays thumbnail images of your friends and their status updates, you can also view their profiles, update yours and write comments. The Twitter app is excellent: view friends updates and post Twitpics directly, although buttons can be slow to respond, so be patient.

 

Another useful feature is Walk Mate Eco. It’s a pedometer telling you your step count and how much CO2 you’ve saved – a journey to T3’s offices taking 2257 steps, saving 321g of CO2.

 

Despite the price, Sony Ericsson hasn’t skimped on connectivity, with WiFi, aGPS, HSDPA and 3G. Texting is a breeze on the numeric keypad, although the 2.2in (240×320 pixel) screen is a bit small, which means that browsing is best for casual use. T3.com takes a slugghish 18 seconds to load over WiFi, with pictures gradually appearing as you scroll down the page. Less complicated websites like BBC load within seconds though.

 

Multimedia

 

Access photos, videos, music and movies via the fantastic Xross Media Bar. They’re stored on the 280MB internal memory, which can be expanded via the MicroSD card slot.

 

There isn’t a 3.5mm jack, so unless you invest in an adaptor, you’ll have to use the supplied headphones. Thanks to a set of EQ settings (including Mega Bass), they’re not bad, although the bass and volume is no match for a dedicated pair of cans. But for the odd tune out and about, they’re fine. As a bonus the headphones double as an excellent handsfree, fading the music in and out as you take a call. Sony Ericsson’s debuting a trio of features on this phone: Noise Shield, Clear Voice and Intelligent Volume Adaptation, certainly call quality is loud and very clear – the person we were speaking to didn’t even realise we were on a handsfree.

 

Using the camera

 

With a dedicated shutter button, the 5MP camera takes decent pictures – especially in bright light. Choose from Twilight Landscape, Twilight Portrait, Landscape, Portrait and Beach/Snow scene modes, adjust the metering, white balance and add filters. Smile shutter and face detection help for portraits, although the LED flash is pretty weak and there’s no option to adjust the ISO. Video resolution is 640×480 pixels and playback is fine, although the pokey screen is a bit small for movies.

 

Sony Ericsson quotes 10 hours (or 4 hours 3G) talktime. With WiFi on, moderate calling, occasional music and regular texts, you’ll end up charging it every other day.

 

In the Elm, Sony Ericsson has created a handset that not only has strong Eco credentials, but it’s well-featured too. It’s not for smartphone lovers, but then at this price, it’s not supposed to be. Browsing isn’t great and for music we’d opt for the Nokia 5800 instead, but for anyone who uses their phone for texting, social networking and taking pictures, who’s not bothered about a touchscreen, it’s is well worth a look.
 

Link: Sony Ericsson

The Elm (J10i2) is the latest addition to Sony Ericsson’s GreenHeart range. It’s a mid-range mobile phone with Facebook and Twitter integration, at a price rivalling the LG Cookie (£100) and Nokia 5800 Xpress Music (£190). With the same human curvature design as the Vivaz, it’s an attractive handset. It’s comfortable to use and the body is lightweight plastic, which is expected at this price.

 

As well as a much smaller box, the Elm’s eco credentials include a digital instead of paper manual and a power-friendly charger. It’s partly made from recycled plastics, and less hazardous chemicals have been used during the manufacturing process.

 

————————————————————

More on Sony Ericsson

Sony Ericsson Vivaz review

Sony Ericsson X10 hands on

Sony Ericsson Xperia Pureness review

————————————————————-

 

Social networking

 

The widget manger application integrates social networking websites, so Facebook, Twitter and My Space feeds are all on the blue standby screen accessed by the up arrow, it’s really useful to have all the apps together, but remember it uses your phones data to update, so check your tariff.

 

Facebook displays thumbnail images of your friends and their status updates, you can also view their profiles, update yours and write comments. The Twitter app is excellent: view friends updates and post Twitpics directly, although buttons can be slow to respond, so be patient.

 

Another useful feature is Walk Mate Eco. It’s a pedometer telling you your step count and how much CO2 you’ve saved – a journey to T3’s offices taking 2257 steps, saving 321g of CO2.

 

Despite the price, Sony Ericsson hasn’t skimped on connectivity, with WiFi, aGPS, HSDPA and 3G. Texting is a breeze on the numeric keypad, although the 2.2in (240×320 pixel) screen is a bit small, which means that browsing is best for casual use. T3.com takes a slugghish 18 seconds to load over WiFi, with pictures gradually appearing as you scroll down the page. Less complicated websites like BBC load within seconds though.

 

Multimedia

 

Access photos, videos, music and movies via the fantastic Xross Media Bar. They’re stored on the 280MB internal memory, which can be expanded via the MicroSD card slot.

 

There isn’t a 3.5mm jack, so unless you invest in an adaptor, you’ll have to use the supplied headphones. Thanks to a set of EQ settings (including Mega Bass), they’re not bad, although the bass and volume is no match for a dedicated pair of cans. But for the odd tune out and about, they’re fine. As a bonus the headphones double as an excellent handsfree, fading the music in and out as you take a call. Sony Ericsson’s debuting a trio of features on this phone: Noise Shield, Clear Voice and Intelligent Volume Adaptation, certainly call quality is loud and very clear – the person we were speaking to didn’t even realise we were on a handsfree.

 

Using the camera

 

With a dedicated shutter button, the 5MP camera takes decent pictures – especially in bright light. Choose from Twilight Landscape, Twilight Portrait, Landscape, Portrait and Beach/Snow scene modes, adjust the metering, white balance and add filters. Smile shutter and face detection help for portraits, although the LED flash is pretty weak and there’s no option to adjust the ISO. Video resolution is 640×480 pixels and playback is fine, although the pokey screen is a bit small for movies.

 

Sony Ericsson quotes 10 hours (or 4 hours 3G) talktime. With WiFi on, moderate calling, occasional music and regular texts, you’ll end up charging it every other day.

 

In the Elm, Sony Ericsson has created a handset that not only has strong Eco credentials, but it’s well-featured too. It’s not for smartphone lovers, but then at this price, it’s not supposed to be. Browsing isn’t great and for music we’d opt for the Nokia 5800 instead, but for anyone who uses their phone for texting, social networking and taking pictures, who’s not bothered about a touchscreen, it’s is well worth a look.
 

Link: Sony Ericsson

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