The One Simple Trick That Can Double Your Adsense

The One Simple Trick That Can Double Your Adsense

I’ve been working with Google’s Adsense program for a while now. If you’re not
already in the program, why not take a look at it now at
https://www.google.com/adsense. I really like Adsense. It makes me money
and it’s easy to work with. Just some simple copy & paste into your webpage
and you’re done. Right?

Wrong! You can do it that way if you want. Who knows? Maybe you’ll get lucky
and get a lot of clicks. But if you’re really serious about making a lot of money
with the program, you’re going to have to tweak it a little.

I’ve invested quite a bit of time experimenting with the program. When I first
signed up, I got some clicks and made a tiny bit of money. That wasn’t good
enough. I knew there must be a way to get more of my visitors to click on the
ads.

Google has a strict policy about not pointing to the ads in any way or asking
people to click on them, so there were two things I couldn’t do. What else was
there?

Then I remembered reading an article once that discussed the psychological
impact of colors on the human mind. I started researching everything I could
find on the subject.

After a lot of reading, many tests and periods of watching my clicks go up and
down, I found the one color combination that seemed to work the best.
Testing previously done at supermarkets had revealed that the same product
could pull more sales from just changing the colors of the label. What were
these colors? Red and yellow! The combination of these two colors has an
immediate impact on the person who sees them. They make your eyes stop and
focus. They pull your eyes right to that part of the page. They grab your
attention! I’m not sure exactly why the combination of red and yellow does this,
but it does. On one of my sites, I changed my Adsense ads to a bright red
border and a yellow background with black text and URL.

My click through rate more than doubled with just that one simple change.
That’s what worked on my site. Your site’s color scheme may work better with a
slightly different color combination. Try lots of different color variations. Make a
change in the morning and let it ride for the whole day. The next morning, try a
different set of colors. Change the border, background, text. Change everything
you can. Most importantly, keep detailed records of the color scheme you used,
click ratio and revenue generated.

After you’ve done all the experimenting you want to, go back to the most
profitable one and let it run for a week or so and see how it does. I’m always
trying different colors even after my run of good clicks with red and yellow.
There are a lot of color combinations to choose from. You never know when
you’ll find just the right one.

The Truth About Google’s Adsense Affiliate Program

The truth about Google’s Adsense program is that it is amazing. It’s the greatest
affiliate program ever invented. There is no affiliate program that even comes
close. If you are not using Google’s Adsense, you’re truly missing out on a great
opportunity. I’ve tried several other affiliate programs, and the only one that is
creating revenue even close to Google’s, is the Amazon.com affiliate program.
Amazon.com’s affiliate program pays 5% commission and up for shipped
products. It’s not really clear how Google pays you, but let me tell you it seems
very fair. They do not pay per clicks, leads, or click throughs; they have a secret
formula that no one will tell. But trust me it works. I was making pennies off of
clicks monthly, until I joined Google. Then the pennies became dollars.

Here are some basic tips for signing up with Google’s Adsense program.

Tip # 1 If you search multiple websites in different categories you’ll find one
thing in common. Almost all of them have Google ads and nothing else. This is
because most other programs are a waste of time. Don’t take my word for it.
Try other programs, but don’t skip Google’s Adsense.

Tip # 2 Google’s search spiders are so specific, that the ads that appear on each
page correspond exactly to some element of that page. Therefore, having ads
from other companies is not a good idea.

TIP # 3 You can place text, image, banner ads and even a search box that will
earn your company revenue. Do not place a search box from another company
on the same page as Google’s search box. They may stop working with you.
In summary, the Adsense program is a great way to make revenue, has
incredibly targeted ads and don’t use other search boxes on the same page as a
Google search box. If you have any questions about Google’s Adsense program,
you can email me at [email protected]

Shawn Ventura is the CEO of http://techpizza.com. He lives with his family in
New York, and is a freelance technology writer.

Gmail shortcuts – Tips and Tricks about GMAIL

C: Compose new message.
Shift + C: Open new window to compose new message.
Slash (/): Switch focus to search box.
K: Switch focus to the next most recent email. Enter or “O” opens focused email.
J: Switch focus to the next oldest email.
N: Switch focus to the next message in the “conversation.” Enter or “O” expands/collapses messages.
P: Switch focus to the previous message.
U: Takes you back to the inbox and checks for new mail.
Y: Various actions depending on current view:
Has no effect in “Sent” and “All Mail” views.

Inbox: Archive email or message.

Starred: Unstar email or message.

Spam: Unmark as spam and move back to “Inbox.”

Trash: Move back to “Inbox.”

Any label: Remove the label.
X: “Check” an email. Various actions can be performed against all checked emails.
S: “Star” an email. Identical to the more familiar term, “flagging.”
R: Reply to the email.
A: Reply to all recipients of the email.
F: Forward an email.
Shift + R: Reply to the email in a new window.
Shift + A: Reply to all recipients of the email in a new window.
Shift + F: Forward an email in a new window.
Shift + 1 (!): Mark an email as spam and remove it from the inbox.
G then I: Switch to “Inbox” view.
G then S: Switch to “Starred” view.
G then A: Switch to “All Mail” view.
G then C: Switch to “Contacts” view.
G then S: Switch to “Drafts” view.
Our Recomendation for Free Email service (It can replace Gmail. Try it your self).

Drafts

Gmail now has the capability to save “Drafts” of your messages! If you are in the middle of composing a message, but want to finish it later, just click on the “Save Draft” button now located between the “Send” and “Discard” buttons. This droops the message in a new view located on the left side called “Drafts” located under the “Sent Mail” link and above the “All Mail” link. Later, you can just click on the message, complete it, and then click “Send” normally.

Cleaning Your Contacts

One of Gmail’s “features” can leave you with extra entries in your Contacts list. Gmail has a (debatably) nice feature that automatically adds to your Contacts list the email addresses of those to whom you send emails. While this can be helpful at times, just remember that EVERY unique email address you send to gets auto-added.

Log into your Gmail account and click on the “Contacts” link at the top of any Gmail page. A window will open displaying any Contacts you may have. Any you have manually edited will typically have a “Name” and possibly a “Note” associated with it. By default, any Contact Gmail auto-adds and is unedited will not contain any “name” or “note” information, just the email address. Visually scan down the list and look for any that fall into this category. If you find one, determine what to do with it: Delete is, Edit it, or leave it alone. Obviously what you do with it is up to you,

What Happens To Sent Messages

When you “send” a message, two things happen to it:

it gets copied into your “All Mail” view, and
it is visible in the “Sent Mail” view.
Many email clients and Webmail services let you optionally delete all sent messages by default, but Gmail doesn’t offer this feature. Here’s why…

One of Gmail’s intentions is to get you out of the “trash everything” mindset. This is one of the reasons why they offer 1GB of storage.

About Labels

You can add a Label to a message in one of two ways:

If you are viewing a message listing, you can just click the checkbox next to the message, click on the “Apply label…” dropdown, and select the Label you want to apply. Gmail will display the Label just to the left of the message’s Subject.
If you are viewing a message, just click on the “Apply label…” dropdown, and select the label you want to apply. Gmail will display the new label to the right of the Subject line.
OK, you assigned a Label to a message, but at a later time, you want to remove it. How do you do that? Just select the Label view from the Labels box on the left, “select” the specific message by clicking the checkbox next to the message, and then click on the “Remove label ‘xxxx'” button at the top of the listing. Your label has now been removed!

Reading Messages

Note a couple things: First, no external graphics are displayed. By default, Gmail disables displaying externally referenced graphics. The reason is that many spam messages contain externally referenced graphics. When they are displayed, the email sender can use this to track that you opened the message thus validating your email address for future spam. Clicking on the “Display External Images” link will display the images if you want.

There is one glaring problem: If the original email is HTML or Rich Text formatted, Gmail will strip out ALL formatting including links, fonts, and images. ie: you can only reply in plain text.

Archiving

One of the first concepts that you have to get used to with Gmail is that of “Archiving”. The overall power of Gmail is in its message management, searching and archival capabilities. With 1GB of storage, the average email user will have enough storage space to hold several years worth of emails. Yes, there will always be emails that you simply don’t want to keep.

Archiving a message simply tells Gmail to remove the message from your Inbox screen and keep it in your “All Mail” screen. All emails will remain in your inbox until you specifically “Archive” them. Archiving simply removes the message from your inbox screen.But what happens to it? Don’t worry, all messages are always accessible through the “All Mail” screen. Archiving simply cleans up your inbox. Once a message has been archived, should you ever want to, you can easily move it back to the inbox, but there really isn’t a need for that.

Cleaning Your Contacts

One of Gmail’s “features” can leave you with extra entries in your Contacts list. Gmail has a (debatably) nice feature that automatically adds to your Contacts list the email addresses of those to whom you send emails. While this can be helpful at times, just remember that EVERY unique email address you send to gets auto-added.

Log into your Gmail account and click on the “Contacts” link at the top of any Gmail page. A window will open displaying any Contacts you may have. Any you have manually edited will typically have a “Name” and possibly a “Note” associated with it. By default, any Contact Gmail auto-adds and is unedited will not contain any “name” or “note” information, just the email address. Visually scan down the list and look for any that fall into this category. If you find one, determine what to do with it: Delete is, Edit it, or leave it alone. Obviously what you do with it is up to you,

Import Contacts

For the best explanation of just how to Import Contacts, log into your Gmail account, click on Contacts, and click on the new “Import Contacts” link at the top of the Contacts screen.

But what can you import and how do you import? Gmail will let you import address books into Contacts from Yahoo!, Orkut, Outlook, and pretty much any other service by uploading CSV (Comma Separated Value) files to your Gmail account. You can even manually edit and create CVS files for importing using Microsoft Excel.

Just remember that currently, Gmail’s Contacts fields are limited to just “Name”, “Email Address”, and “Notes”. According to the Help screen, all other fields will be imported into the Notes field.

The Pirate Bay: Users can delete accounts ahead of sale

IDG News Service – The operators of The Pirate Bay will allow users to delete their accounts on the torrent-tracking site, a feature many users have requested since a deal to sell the site was announced Tuesday.
Swedish Internet cafe operator Global Gaming Factory X (GGF) announced on Tuesday that it plans to buy The Pirate Bay for $7.8 million, prompting negative reactions from many of the site’s users.
“Many people have asked about having their account removed, and we will not force anyone to stay on,” The Pirate Bay’s operators wrote in a posting to the site’s blog on Tuesday.
The operators planned to build a user deletion interface later Tuesday, according to the posting.
Users should not worry about their personal data falling into the wrong hands, they said.
“We have no logs of anything, no personal data will be transferred in the eventual sale (since no personal data is kept). So no need to be worried for safety,” they wrote.
While the question of logs is important in some European countries, Sweden has yet to adopt into national law a European directive requiring telecommunications and Internet companies to retain data about their customers’ online activities for law enforcement purposes.
Comments on the deal were not confined to requests for the account deletion feature. Other users called the site operators sellouts and said the deal will kill The Pirate Bay.
The operators wrote, however, that The Pirate Bay couldn’t afford to develop its services further without outside help.
“We cannot finance the growth of the site anymore,” they wrote, adding that the deal with GGF was the only available option.
Many users are still upset over that deal, but there also more understanding comments to the blog posting. “You will always have my support!” a user identified as blake324 wrote. And someone known as MassExodus said, “Thank you The Pirate Bay for all you’ve provided over the years — we’ll see how it pans out over the next few months.”